Posts

data breach claims
, ,

23,000 Fortnum & Mason customers could be entitled to data breach compensation

High-end grocer Fortnum & Mason, has become the latest business to suffer a significant data breach due to hackers. This week, the store revealed that 23,000 customers have had their personal details stolen. The compromised information includes email addresses, home addresses, phone numbers and social media names.

Those affected should now consider claiming for data breach compensation.

People who may have had their details stolen include:

  • Those who voted for the TV personality of the year category at the store’s food and drink awards
  • People who entered a competition to win tickets for an exhibition of Charles I’s art collection
  • Customers who filled in a survey about the concierge service at Fortnum & Mason’s Piccadilly store.

The poll had been organised by Typeform, a company which specialises in creating surveys and forms. On 27 June Typeform discovered that an unknown third party had accessed its server and downloaded information. In response, it “immediately and fixed the source of the breach.”

Commenting on the latest data protection scandal, Fortnum & Mason chief executive Ewan Venters has said that the hack is mostly limited to email addresses and there is no evidence that highly sensitive information like bank details or credit cards have been accessed.

However, today’s cybercriminals don’t just care about our financial information. They can also cause chaos with personally identifiable information such as an email address. In fact, with enough data, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

The Fortnum & Mason data breach comes hot on the heels of a similar incident at Ticketmaster.

These types of incidents are becoming increasingly common and they often have severe consequences for those affected, so you could be entitled to thousands of pounds in data breach compensation. What’s more, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

All those affected have been contacted. So, if you have received confirmation that your details have been hacked, we would urge you to let us know and start a data breach compensation claim. If you took part in any of the surveys or polls listed above and you haven’t received an email, make sure that you check your junk mail folder.

Once registered with us, we’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can claim. You should also raise any concerns with the ICO.

 

REGISTER NOW

data breach compensation
, ,

Ticketmaster data hack: what are the different types of data breaches?

Earlier this year, Ticketmaster was affected by a significant data protection breach after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website. And the number of people impacted by the theft of their details could be significantly worse than first thought.

But not everyone who is a victim of the Ticketmaster data hack has had the same information stolen. So, what are the different types of data breaches in this case?

Financial information stolen and used

There are reports that customers of Ticketmaster have been the victims of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among others).

To make matters worse, according to digital bank Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that something strange was going on two months before the business revealed its payment pages had been hacked. However, in responding to the bank’s concerns, Ticketmaster said that: “an internal investigation had found no evidence of a breach and that no other banks were reporting similar patterns.”

Anyone who has had their financial details stolen and used fraudulently could now be looking at compensation up to £5,000.

Financial information stolen

Many of those affected by the Ticketmaster data breach will have had their financial details stolen but not used (at least not yet). And these people are also entitled to make a data breach compensation claim.

Of course, there are those that will argue that, while it is acceptable to claim compensation for any financial losses, you should put up with any anxiety caused by having your information robbed. That claiming for distress is an overreaction and that your psychological suffering and anguish doesn’t matter. Luckily the law doesn’t look at things this way and recognises the amount of damage that can be caused by worry and upset.

Being the victim of a crime can have a significant impact on you mentally and physically, and the effects can include a lack of sleep, feeling ill, unsettled or confused. Stress can also affect your friends, your family and your job. So being told to “get over it” isn’t helpful.

Crucially, you can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach, even if you have not experienced any financial loss.

If you had your financial details stolen during the Ticketmaster data hack, you could be looking at compensation up to £3,000.

Email address stolen

If your email account has been hacked the consequences could be devastating. Not only does it give hackers access to lots of private data about you, but it also gives them a gateway into resetting passwords and accessing additional account information (such as your financial and social media accounts).

Sometimes hackers might even change your settings to forward a copy of every email you receive to themselves before you’ve had a chance to save your password. They might even start using your account as a gateway to your friends and contacts. Your email could also be passed on to third parties, so you become the target of sustained phishing attempts and spam.

So, if you have had your email address stolen it’s vital that you hold Ticketmaster to account.

Again, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence of your data being used. If the distress of having your data in the hands of cybercriminals has caused you suffering, you can make a claim.

Anyone who has had their email address stolen could be looking at compensation up to £1,500.

Other personal information stolen

Along with the financial info and email addresses stolen, the Ticketmaster hackers also gained access to personally identifiable information (PII).

PII includes any data that can be used to identify a specific individual, and, if it gets into the wrong hands, it can be used to undertake identity fraud.

For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

Anyone who has had their personal data stolen could be looking at compensation up to £500 – £1,000.

Claim Compensation Now

We have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their personal data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, at Hayes Connor, we are supporting no-win, no-fee compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach.

Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

REGISTER NOW

ticketmaster claim
, ,

You can make a claim against Ticketmaster now

Last month, Ticketmaster became the latest company to be affected by a data hack. Estimates suggest that 40,000 people in the UK could be involved; although the final number could be much higher.

The Ticketmaster data hack compromised personal and financial information including customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and account login details. Worse, some customers have already had their cards used by cybercriminals.

Following the Ticketmaster data hack, an investigation is now underway by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). If found responsible for this shocking data protection failure the ticket sales company will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. However, this is little compensation for victims who have suffered financial loss and/or stress due to Ticketmaster’s possible negligence.

There is, however, some good news for Ticketmaster customers. Because even though the investigation is still ongoing, you can claim against Ticketmaster now.

Make a Ticketmaster compensation claim with Hayes Connor Solicitors

At Hayes Connor we are already representing people who have been put at risk due to the Ticketmaster data hack. And we are doing this in a no-win, no-fee basis. This means, if your claim is not successful, you won’t have to pay a penny.

Find out more about no-win, no-fee data breach claims here.

What’s more, to ensure you receive the maximum compensation possible, we will also keep our fee capped at 25% of any compensation you receive if you do win.

While in some data breach cases settlement can take over two years to achieve – particularly when waiting for the outcome of an ICO investigation – we have a process in place that means we will be looking to lodge claims in the next few weeks.

What should you do now?

To start a compensation claim following the Ticketmaster data hack, register with Hayes Connor Solicitors. Doing this guarantees that you will form part of the compensation claims that will be lodged by the firm. Once you have registered with us, it’s important to keep a ‘diary’ or note of events since the hack. This should include things like:

  • Whether your card been used without permission
  • If there are any transactions that your bank has picked up that you haven’t made
  • Whether you are getting more spam or junk email with your name on it
  • If you are anxious or worried at the thought of people being able to access your data.

IF YOU WISH TO BE A PART OF THIS CLAIM THEN REGISTER YOUR DETAILS TODAY.

ticketmaster data breach
, ,

How much compensation could you receive following the Ticketmaster data hack?

Last month, Ticketmaster revealed that it was the target of a serious and severe data hack. Early estimates suggest that the attack compromised the personal and financial information of 40,000 people in the UK. However, the final number could be much higher.

Exploiting a weakness on the Ticketmaster payment site, hackers managed to access customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. And, it already looks like Ticketmaster customers have already had their cards fraudulently used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items).

Of course, today’s cybercriminals don’t just care about our bank details. They can also cause havoc with our name and other personally identifiable information. In fact, with enough data, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

An ICO investigation is now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, and if found responsible for this appalling data protection failure the ticket sales company will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine.

However, this is little compensation for victims who have suffered financial loss and/or stress due to Ticketmaster’s possible negligence.

So, while the ICO does not award data breach compensation, our data breach solicitors can help you with that.

Ticketmaster Compensation

How much you might win if you had your financial details stolen and they were used fraudulently £5,000
How much you might win if you had your financial details stolen £3,000
How much you might win if you had your email address stolen £1,500
How much you might win if you had other personal information stolen £500-1,000

Claim Compensation Now

We have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their personal data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, at Hayes Connor, we are preparing to launch compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach. Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000.

REGISTER NOW

ticketmaster data breach claim
, , ,

Ticketmaster Data Breach Worse Than Thought

Ticketmaster revealed a significant breach of user payment details after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website in 2018. The data breach affected Ticketmaster, TicketWeb and the resale website Get Me In!

But what happened in the Ticketmaster data breach and where are we now?

Ticketmaster admitted that a data breach took place due to third-party software on its website. This was subsequently removed, but not before the software accessed thousands of its customers’ personal and financial details.

HOW did Ticketmaster make matters Worse?

Appallingly, it was later reported that Ticketmaster knew about the data breach two months before it revealed its payment pages had been hacked, AND that some customers of the ticket sales company had their cards used fraudulently.

To make matters worse, while Ticketmaster declined to say how many of its customers were affected – and referred all press inquiries to its PR agency – estimates predicted that 40,000 people in the UK had their payment details swiped.

 

HOW CAN CYBERCRIMINALS USE YOUR PRIVATE DATA? 

The Ticketmaster data protection breach compromised customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details.

Digital bank Monzo believes that some Ticketmaster customers had their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among others).

Along with the financial info stolen, the hackers also gained access to personally identifiable information (PII). PII includes any data that can be used to identify a specific individual, and, if it gets into the wrong hands, it can be used to undertake identity fraud.  For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

Signs that criminals have used your data following the Ticketmaster data breach include:

  • Bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
  • Unfamiliar transactions from your account
  • An unexpected dip in your credit score
  • Unsolicited communications that ask for your personal data or refer you to a web page asking for personal data.

 COULD THE TICKETMASTER DATA BREACH AFFECT YOUR HEALTH? 

Yes. And crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. A personal data breach is a 21st-century version of being burgled and being the victim of a crime can have a significant impact on you mentally and physically. So, if the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

 

THE REAL LIFE IMPACT OF THE TICKETMASTER DATA BREACH 

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we’re helping victims of the Ticketmaster data breach to claim compensation after their data was put at risk.

But, some nine months after the breach, what are the real-life effects of the Ticketmaster data hack?

  • 63% of all the clients we took on suffered multiple fraudulent transactions on their payment cards
  • 31% of all clients involved in this case suffered from distress and/or psychological trauma.

 

HOLDING TICKETMASTER TO ACCOUNT

While Ticketmaster was the victim of a cyber-attack, it was responsible for protecting your personal information. So, if you have suffered damage or distress caused by this hack, you have a right to claim compensation.

According to Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that it might be at risk as early as April 2018, but an internal investigation by the company failed to reveal any security issues.

Commenting on this case, Natasha Vernier, Head of Financial Crime at Monzo said:

 “On Friday 6th April, around 50 customers got in touch with us to report fraudulent transactions on their accounts and we immediately replaced their cards.

“After investigating, our Financial Crime and Security team noticed a pattern: 70% of the customers affected had used their cards with the same online merchant between December of last year and April this year. That merchant was Ticketmaster. This seemed unusual, as overall only 0.8% of all our customers had used Ticketmaster.”

As the matter intensified, between 19-20 April last year, Monzo sent out six thousand replacement cards to customers who had used Ticketmaster. However, on 19 April, Ticketmaster claimed that there was no evidence of a breach. It also said that no other banks were reporting similar security patterns.

 

IS TICKETMASTER TO BLAME?

Now trying to defend its behaviour, Ticketmaster is blaming a third-party supplier for the security breach. And, it has been confirmed that the hack occurred due to a single piece of JavaScript code customised by a third-party to meet Ticketmaster’s requirements. Identifying a weakness in this code, attackers used this vulnerability to extract customer information as they were paying for tickets.

However, it is likely that Ticketmaster was still negligent in safeguarding your data due to insufficient security systems. Just because they were a victim of a crime does not mean they are any less liable.

Worryingly, a senior software developer at a leading UK cybersecurity company has added:

“If the malicious actor had access to this ‘backend’ what else have they done and what dormant malicious code could still be residing ready to activate?”

 With data breaches on the rise, something has to be done to make big companies accountable for data losses, so claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests, it could be the only way to ensure that businesses everywhere implement more secure processes.

 HAVE YOU BEEN AFFECTED?

UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 2018 may be at risk, as well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23 2018.

Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those involved. But, while it has offered customers free security software, it has not provided data breach compensation.

If you have been emailed by Ticketmaster and told that your details are at risk, make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data breach compensation claim.

 WHAT SHOULD YOU DO NOW?

With an ICO investigation now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, whoever is to blame for this appalling data protection failure will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. But the ICO does not award data breach compensation.

Over the last few months we’ve talked to hundreds of people who have been affected by this shocking privacy breach, and our compensation claim on behalf of 650 claimants is now in progress. But the clock is ticking and we soon may not be able to take on any more claimants.

We believe that we are the only UK legal firm currently launching a multi-party action against Ticketmaster. So, if you want to secure compensation for the impact the data breach has had on you, don’t leave it too late.

Why join our multi-party action?

Multi party actions give our clients more power against big businesses. This is because a group of people who have suffered the same or similar injuries due to the negligence of the same defendant (in this case Ticketmaster) join together to claim for compensation. In short, it gives us strength in numbers.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation. Making a claim is simple and doing so sends a message to organisations everywhere that they must do more to protect their customers from identity and financial theft, and emotional distress.

REGISTER NOW

 

ticketmaster data breach
, ,

TICKETMASTER WAS WARNED ABOUT DATA HACK​

Earlier this week, Ticketmaster admitted to a huge data protection breach. The hack, which impacts thousands of people in the UK, compromised customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. And, victims should now be looking to secure data breach compensation.

A delay in reporting

While Ticketmaster reported the issue to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) – which it is required to do by law – it seems that the company was alerted to the breach back in early April, but failed to do anything about it. This delay is bound to be taken into consideration in any data breach compensation claim.

Worse, there are now reports that customers have been the victim of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items). And digital bank Monzo believes that Ticketmaster is the link between these fraudulent transactions.

What happened?

According to Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that something strange was going on two months before the business revealed its payment pages had been hacked. But, in responding to the bank’s concerns, Ticketmaster said that: “an internal investigation had found no evidence of a breach and that no other banks were reporting similar patterns.”

Defending its actions at that time, Ticketmaster is now blaming third-party supplier Inbenta for the security breach. And the failure did happen after Inbenta was infected with malicious software while having access to the Ticketmaster website.

Ticketmaster maintains that: “When a bank or credit card provider alerts us to suspicious activity it is always investigated thoroughly with our acquiring bank, which processes card payments on our behalf. In this case, there was an investigation, but there was no evidence that the issue originated with Ticketmaster.”

However, Inbenta has put the blame back with Ticketmaster. It claims the ticket-giant placed JavaScript on the payment pages it hosts, without Inbenta’sknowledge. It was this script that was abused by hackers. In a statement, Inbenta said: “Had we known that the customized script was being used this way, we would have advised against it, as it incurs greater risk for vulnerability.”

With an ICO investigation now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, whoever is to blame for this appalling data protection failure will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. And, while the ICO does not award data breach compensation, our data breach solicitors can help you with that.

In addition to the initial negligence, Ticketmaster will also have to answer questions over why there was a delay in disclosing the breach.

What can you do to claim data breach compensation?

The data breach affects Ticketmaster, TicketWeb andthe resale website Get Me In!

UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 this year may be affected. As well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23.

Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those affected. But, while it has offered customers free security software, it has not provided data breach compensation.

However, it is clear that cybercriminals have access to this data and have already used it to carry our fraud, so more has to be done to hold Ticketmaster and any negligent third-party to account.

If you have been contacted by Ticketmaster and told that your details are at risk, you should make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data breach compensation claim.

As specialist data protection lawyers, we would urge anyone contacted to let us know. If you are a Ticketmaster or Get Me In user and you haven’t received an email make sure that you check your junk mail folder. If you have received an email, get in touch. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

What’s more, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.

, ,

Ticketmaster admits serious data breach

Ticketmaster has admitted a huge data protection breach and revealed that the personal information of thousands of UK customers is now at risk. The data protection breach happened after a supplier to Ticketmaster was infected with malicious software while having access to the Ticketmaster website. The breach also affects customers of TicketWeb and the resale website Get Me In! Both of which are owned by Ticketmaster.
The company will have to face questions over whether there was a delay in disclosing the breach, as it has been revealed that some UK banks have known about the incident since early April.
The data hack involves both personal and payment information which can be used to carry out data theft and financial fraud. The data stolen includes names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details.
According to the Guardian, “a number of Ticketmaster customers have already had fraudulent transactions debited from their accounts, with the fraudsters spending people’s cash on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix, among other items”.
It appears that digital bank Monzo was the first to realise that its customers’ cards were being compromised and even identified Ticketmaster as the shared link in a spike in frauds. However, despite warning Ticketmaster of the issue, Monzo’s head of financial crime said that they “couldn’t get any traction” out of the company.
UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 this year may be affected as well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23.
Ticketmaster has said that it is working with the relevant authorities, as well as credit card companies and banks.
However, even though Ticketmaster has self-reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), there are no reports of them notifying the police. However, we fully believe that the police should be informed, so it’s important that anyone affected lets them know (as well as letting the ICO know).
Find out more about reporting a cybercrime to the police.

So far, Ticketmaster has offered customers free security software but no monetary compensation. However, you should make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data protection act compensation claim.
In this case, it is likely that Ticketmaster (or its third-party associates) were negligent in safeguarding your data due to insufficient security systems. Just because they were a victim of a crime does not mean they are any less liable. They delay in reporting this issue makes the company’s failure even more severe.
Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those affected.

So, if you have received an email, we would urge anyone contacted to let us know and start a data protection compensation claim.

If you are a Ticketmaster, Get Me In or TicketWeb user and you haven’t received an email make sure that you check your junk mail folder.

If you have received an email, get in touch.

We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can claim.

What’s more, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.
Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.