Updates on the Ticketmaster data breach affecting UK customers

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Ticketmaster data breach: putting GDPR to the test

Following the Ticketmaster data breach – where cybercriminals got away with customers’ personal and financial information- the latest data protection regulations are now being put to the test.

Unless you have been living under a rock, you will have heard about GDPR. In fact, you’re probably fed up hearing about it. But GDPR is likely to have a significant impact on the way companies handle your valuable data; with enormous fines for those that don’t look after it properly.

And, according to data protection lawyers, the Ticketmaster data breach could be a real test to see if the legislation will hold companies to account.

What happened in the Ticketmaster data breach?

Ticketmaster was affected by a substantial data protection breach after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website. Different customers had different data stolen including:

  • Financial information stolen and used. There are reports that customers of Ticketmaster have been the victims of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among others). Anyone who has had their financial details stolen and used fraudulently could now be looking at compensation in the region of £5,000
  • Financial information stolen. Many of those affected by the Ticketmaster data breach will have had their financial details stolen but not used (at least not yet). Crucially, you can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach, even if you have not experienced any financial loss. If you had your financial details stolen during the Ticketmaster data hack, you could be looking at compensation in the region of £3,000
  • Email address stolen. If your email account has been hacked the consequences could be devastating. Again, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence of your data being used. If the distress of having your data in the hands of cybercriminals has caused you suffering, you can make a claim. Anyone who has had their email address stolen could be looking at compensation in the region of £1,500
  • Other personal information stolen. Along with the financial info and email addresses stolen, the Ticketmaster hackers also gained access to personally identifiable information (PII). PII includes any data that can be used to identify a specific individual, and, if it gets into the wrong hands, it can be used to undertake identity fraud. Anyone who has had their personal data stolen could be looking at compensation in the region of £500 – £1,000.

 

Find out more about the different types of data breaches in this case.

Ticketmaster data breach and GDPR

The Ticketmaster data breach affects up to 40,000 people who bought tickets between September 2017 and 23 June 2018. With the GDPR coming into force on May 25th 2018, this means that the breach spans two different data protection acts:

  • The Data Protection Act (DPA) 1998
  • The Data Protection Act (DPA) 2018 (the UK’s version of the GDPR).

These acts have drastically different level of fines. The first up to a maximum of £500,000 and the second up to £17 million (or 4% of an organisation’s annual turnover, whichever is higher).

It is not yet clear which legislation is relevant, but the breach could be judged under both. Alternatively, the entire data protection failure could be treated as a breach under GDPR as it kept happening after the new laws came into force. If GDPR is used, the Ticketmaster data breach case will be considered a test case that is likely to set the tone for action to be taken by the ICO in future breaches.

What does this mean for you?

In truth, while data protection lawyers are eagerly waiting to see what legislation applies, for people who had had their data breached it doesn’t make much difference. Mainly because, while the ICO can impose a fine on a company, this isn’t given to victims of the data breach.

The only way for you to hold Ticketmaster to account is to make a data breach compensation claim.

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, we are supporting no-win, no-fee compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach. Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

Find out more about making a claim against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

 

REGISTER NOW

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Ticketmaster to close resale site Get Me In. Can you still make a data breach claim?

The Ticketmaster data breach saw cybercriminals get away with the personal and financial information of thousands of people in the UK. As well as the main Ticketmaster site, the data hack also affected, TicketWeb and the resale website Get Me In.

Following the breach, Ticketmaster is now closing its secondary ticketing websites Seatwave and Get Me In, in a bid to combat touts. However, if you used Get Me In and were affected by the data breach, you can still make a compensation claim against the company.

The Information Commissioners Office (ICO) has already made it clear that it does not approve of companies closing to evade data breach inquiries. Earlier this year, and following the announcement that controversial data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica was to shut down, the ICO said that: “investigations cannot be impeded by the closure of these companies.”

In this case, there is no evidence that this is why Get Me In is closing. In fact, according to Ticketmaster: “We know that fans are tired of seeing others snap up tickets just to resell for a profit on secondary websites, so we have taken action”.

However, it is vital that Get Me In customers affected by the Ticketmaster data breach know their rights and are not put off making a claim.

What happened in the Ticketmaster data breach case?

Ticketmaster was affected by a substantial data protection breach after cybercriminals hacked the company’s websites. Different customers had different data stolen including financial information (some of which was fraudulently used), email addresses and other personally identifiable information (PII).

Find out more about the different types of data breaches in this case.

Make a Ticketmaster data breach claim

The only way for you to hold Ticketmaster to account is to make a data breach compensation claim.

Crucially, the law recognises the potential damage that is caused by physiological suffering. So, you can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach, even if you have not experienced any financial loss.

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, we have now submitted a letter before action (LBA) to Ticketmaster. This LBA lets Ticketmaster know that we plan to start proceedings against them, and that we are very serious about getting our clients the compensation they deserve.

If you want to join our action against Ticketmaster, it is not too late!

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. To date, our action against Ticketmaster has more than 500 clients, and it is clear that the data breach is extensive. As such, we expect Ticketmaster to take our claim very seriously.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to up to £5,000.

REGISTER NOW 

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Starting data breach compensation proceedings against Ticketmaster

Following the Ticketmaster data breach, our action has more than 500 clients, and we are now in the final stages of preparing these claims.

To keep you up-to-date with our progress, here is a quick summary of the steps we are taking, and what you must do if you want to make a data breach case against Ticketmaster.

Finalising a letter before action in the Ticketmaster data breach case

Later this week, Hayes Connor Solicitors is meeting with specialist barristers Ian Whitehurst and Louis Browne QC of Exchange Chambers to finalise the letter before action (LBA).

Ian has significant experience in the niche areas of cybercrime and data protection, while Louis has vast experience of both advising and acting in very high-value claims.

The LBA will be drafted on behalf of all clients signed to the Ticketmaster action by the 10th of August 2018 and will include:

  • The name and address of each individual making a claim
  • A summary of what’s happened in their particular circumstances
  • What we want Ticketmaster to do about it
  • How much each client is claiming for (and how we have calculated that amount)
  • A deadline for reply
  • Notice that we will start court proceedings on behalf of our clients if we don’t get a reply.

If you haven’t yet told us that you want to make a case against Ticketmaster, it’s essential that you do this ASAP.

REGISTER YOUR DETAILS

Issuing a letter before action following the Ticketmaster data breach

We intend to submit the LBA on 15th August 2018. The LBA not only lets Ticketmaster know that we will be starting proceedings against them, but also that we are very serious about getting you the compensation you deserve.

Ticketmaster will then have 21 days to respond to this letter.

If you have already told us that you want to make a data breach claim against Ticketmaster, and have completed and returned our initial pack and impact form, this response will dictate the next steps we take to recover your losses.

If you have already registered with us, but haven’t yet completed these documents, it’s vital that you do so ASAP.

Should you have mislaid your documents or require a further copy, please let us know and we will send another set out to you straight away.

If you want to join our action against Ticketmaster it is not too late!

If you want to make a data breach claim against Ticketmaster, it is vital that you register with us ASAP so that we can assess the impact the breach has had on you. Once you have done this, we will be in touch to let you know the next steps, including what will be claiming for and how much compensation you could receive.

We are dealing with Ticketmaster data breach claims on a no-win, no-fee basis. This means that, if your claim is not successful, you won’t have to pay a penny. There are no hidden charges or other administration fees.

Find out more about how we can do this.

To date, our action against Ticketmaster has more than 500 clients, and it is clear that the data breach is extensive. As such, we expect them to take our claim very seriously.

 

While each case is different, if successful, you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation, so it’s essential to act now.

 

REGISTER YOUR DETAILS

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Ticketmaster data hack: what are the different types of data breaches?

Earlier this year, Ticketmaster was affected by a significant data protection breach after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website. And the number of people impacted by the theft of their details could be significantly worse than first thought.

But not everyone who is a victim of the Ticketmaster data hack has had the same information stolen. So, what are the different types of data breaches in this case?

Financial information stolen and used

There are reports that customers of Ticketmaster have been the victims of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among others).

To make matters worse, according to digital bank Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that something strange was going on two months before the business revealed its payment pages had been hacked. However, in responding to the bank’s concerns, Ticketmaster said that: “an internal investigation had found no evidence of a breach and that no other banks were reporting similar patterns.”

Anyone who has had their financial details stolen and used fraudulently could now be looking at compensation up to £5,000.

Financial information stolen

Many of those affected by the Ticketmaster data breach will have had their financial details stolen but not used (at least not yet). And these people are also entitled to make a data breach compensation claim.

Of course, there are those that will argue that, while it is acceptable to claim compensation for any financial losses, you should put up with any anxiety caused by having your information robbed. That claiming for distress is an overreaction and that your physiological suffering and anguish doesn’t matter. Luckily the law doesn’t look at things this way and recognises the amount of damage that can be caused by worry and upset.

Being the victim of a crime can have a significant impact on you mentally and physically, and the effects can include a lack of sleep, feeling ill, unsettled or confused. Stress can also affect your friends, your family and your job. So being told to “get over it” isn’t helpful.

Crucially, you can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach, even if you have not experienced any financial loss.

If you had your financial details stolen during the Ticketmaster data hack, you could be looking at compensation up to £3,000.

Email address stolen

If your email account has been hacked the consequences could be devastating. Not only does it give hackers access to lots of private data about you, but it also gives them a gateway into resetting passwords and accessing additional account information (such as your financial and social media accounts).

Sometimes hackers might even change your settings to forward a copy of every email you receive to themselves before you’ve had a chance to save your password. They might even start using your account as a gateway to your friends and contacts. Your email could also be passed on to third parties, so you become the target of sustained phishing attempts and spam.

So, if you have had your email address stolen it’s vital that you hold Ticketmaster to account.

Again, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence of your data being used. If the distress of having your data in the hands of cybercriminals has caused you suffering, you can make a claim.

Anyone who has had their email address stolen could be looking at compensation up to £1,500.

Other personal information stolen

Along with the financial info and email addresses stolen, the Ticketmaster hackers also gained access to personally identifiable information (PII).

PII includes any data that can be used to identify a specific individual, and, if it gets into the wrong hands, it can be used to undertake identity fraud.

For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

Anyone who has had their personal data stolen could be looking at compensation up to £500 – £1,000.

Claim Compensation Now

We have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their personal data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, at Hayes Connor, we are supporting no-win, no-fee compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach.

Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

REGISTER NOW

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Ticketmaster data breach could be tip of the iceberg

Ticketmaster was affected by a significant data protection breach after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website. However, it now looks like the number of people impacted by the theft is significantly worse than first thought.

What has happened so far?

A hacker group has accessed thousands of Ticketmaster customers’ payment details. Some customers of the ticket sales company have had their cards used fraudulently.

Investigating the Ticketmaster data breach, cybersecurity analysts RiskIQ have now identified the hacker group responsible for the malicious code placed on the Ticketmaster websites.

However, RiskIQ not only states that Magecart – a malicious hacking group – perpetrated the Ticketmaster attack, but that was also undertaking a massive credit card skimming operation that has affected over 800 e-commerce websites.

Worse, it appears that this hacking operation has been active since December 2016.

What is the extent of the problem?

It now looks likely that the Ticketmaster data theft was part of a larger credit card scheme. In fact, we could be looking at the biggest theft of credit card details to date.

According to RiskIQ, the hackers behind the attack “seem to have gotten smarter,”. And “rather than go after websites, they’ve figured out that it’s easier to compromise third-party suppliers of scripts and add their skimmer {code}. In some cases, compromising one of these suppliers gives them nearly 10,000 victims instantly.”

Put simply, Magecart could have stolen the credit card information of thousands of people across various websites, by merely targeting only a few companies. Some of the third-party companies allegedly compromised by Magecart include SocialPlus, PushAssist, Clarity Connect and Annex Cloud.

Ticketmaster uses SocialPlus. So, while Inbenta (a third-party software provider) has been established as the entry point for the malicious attack on its systems, at least one other source containing the skimmer had access to the Ticketmaster websites.

So, there could be a lot more to the recent Ticketmaster data breach than first thought.

What does this mean?

Because many shops use these third-parties, RiskIQ claims to have “identified nearly 100 top-tier victims, mainly online shops of some of the largest brands in the world.” It’s not yet clear which e-commerce sites have been affected.

Cyberthreat expert Ross Brewer has said that: “Third party data breaches are a growing problem for businesses. Hackers are persistent. They’re redirecting their attention to smaller, third-party suppliers that can act as a gateway to more lucrative targets. As the saying goes, you’re only as strong as your weakest link, which means if one of your third-party partners doesn’t have the same commitment to data protection, any tools you have in place are essentially rendered useless.”

What now?

There is more to this story than victims were initially told. And, while early estimates predict that 40,000 people in the UK have had their payment details swiped. It now looks likely that this number is much, much higher.

However, regardless of who was behind the attack, Ticketmaster was responsible for keeping your data safe, and this is something it has failed to do.

The Ticketmaster data protection breach has compromised customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. Data that can be used by cybercriminals to steal money from you, apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and more.

So, if you have suffered damage or distress caused by this hack, you have a right to claim compensation. Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those involved, so if you have received this email let us know!

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.

With data breaches on the rise, something has to be done to make big companies accountable for data losses, so claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests, it could be the only way to ensure that businesses everywhere implement more secure processes.

REGISTER NOW

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You can make a claim against Ticketmaster now

Last month, Ticketmaster became the latest company to be affected by a data hack. Estimates suggest that 40,000 people in the UK could be involved; although the final number could be much higher.

The Ticketmaster data hack compromised personal and financial information including customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and account login details. Worse, some customers have already had their cards used by cybercriminals.

Following the Ticketmaster data hack, an investigation is now underway by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). If found responsible for this shocking data protection failure the ticket sales company will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. However, this is little compensation for victims who have suffered financial loss and/or stress due to Ticketmaster’s possible negligence.

There is, however, some good news for Ticketmaster customers. Because even though the investigation is still ongoing, you can claim against Ticketmaster now.

Make a Ticketmaster compensation claim with Hayes Connor Solicitors

At Hayes Connor we are already representing people who have been put at risk due to the Ticketmaster data hack. And we are doing this in a no-win, no-fee basis. This means, if your claim is not successful, you won’t have to pay a penny.

Find out more about no-win, no-fee data breach claims here.

What’s more, to ensure you receive the maximum compensation possible, we will also keep our fee capped at 25% of any compensation you receive if you do win.

Of course, in an ideal world, you would receive all of your compensation. Unfortunately, however, we have to charge a “success fee” to cover our costs in smaller/individual cases.

However, if enough people come forward to make a claim against Ticketmaster, we might be able to waive this fee and get Ticketmaster to pay it instead of you. That would mean that there are no solicitor’s fees win or lose.

While each case is different, if successful, you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation, so it’s essential to act.

While in some data breach cases settlement can take over two years to achieve – particularly when waiting for the outcome of an ICO investigation – we have a process in place that means we will be looking to lodge claims in the next few weeks.

What should you do now?

 To start a compensation claim following the Ticketmaster data hack, register with Hayes Connor Solicitors. Doing this guarantees that you will form part of the compensation claims that will be lodged by the firm. Once you have registered with us, it’s important to keep a ‘diary’ or note of events since the hack. This should include things like:

  • Whether your card been used without permission
  • If there are any transactions that your bank has picked up that you haven’t made
  • If you are getting more spam or junk email with your name on it
  • If you are anxious or worried at the thought of people being able to access your data.

IF YOU WISH TO BE A PART OF THIS CLAIM THEN REGISTER YOUR DETAILS TODAY.

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How much compensation could you receive following the Ticketmaster data hack?

Last month, Ticketmaster revealed that it was the target of a serious and severe data hack. Early estimates suggest that the attack compromised the personal and financial information of 40,000 people in the UK. However, the final number could be much higher.

Exploiting a weakness on the Ticketmaster payment site, hackers managed to access customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. And, it already looks like Ticketmaster customers have already had their cards fraudulently used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items).

Of course, today’s cybercriminals don’t just care about our bank details. They can also cause havoc with our name and other personally identifiable information. In fact, with enough data, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

An ICO investigation is now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, and if found responsible for this appalling data protection failure the ticket sales company will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine.

However, this is little compensation for victims who have suffered financial loss and/or stress due to Ticketmaster’s possible negligence.

So, while the ICO does not award data breach compensation, our data breach solicitors can help you with that.

Ticketmaster Compensation

How much you might win if you had your financial details stolen and they were used fraudulently £5,000
How much you might win if you had your financial details stolen £3,000
How much you might win if you had your email address stolen £1,500
How much you might win if you had other personal information stolen £500-1,000

Claim Compensation Now

We have already been contacted by lots of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their personal data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, at Hayes Connor, we are preparing to launch compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach. Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000.

REGISTER NOW

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Ticketmaster Data Breach Worse Than Thought

Last week, Ticketmaster revealed a significant breach of user payment details after cybercriminals hacked the company’s website. The data breach affects Ticketmaster, TicketWeb and the resale website Get Me In!

Appallingly, it has since been reported that Ticketmaster knew about the data breach two months before it revealed its payment pages had been hacked, AND that some customers of the ticket sales company have had their cards used fraudulently.

To make matters worse, while Ticketmaster has declined to say how many of its customers have been affected – and is referring all press inquiries to its PR agency – early estimates predict that 40,000 people in the UK have had their payment details swiped. However, the number could be even higher.

HOW CAN CYBERCRIMINALS USE YOUR PRIVATE DATA? 

The Ticketmaster data protection breach has compromised customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. Digital bank Monzo believes that some Ticketmaster customers have had their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items).

Along with the financial info stolen, the hackers also gained access to personally identifiable information (PII). PII includes any data that can be used to identify a specific individual, and, if it gets into the wrong hands, it can be used to undertake identity fraud.  For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

Signs that criminals have used your data following the Ticketmaster data breach include:

  • Bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
  • Unfamiliar transactions from your account
  • An unexpected dip in your credit score
  • Unsolicited communications that ask for your personal data or refer you to a web page asking for personal data.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. A personal data breach is a 21st-century version of being burgled and being the victim of a crime can have a significant impact on you mentally and physically. So, if the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

HOLDING TICKETMASTER TO ACCOUNT

While Ticketmaster was the victim of a cyber-attack, it was responsible for protecting your personal information. So, if you have suffered damage or distress caused by this hack, you have a right to claim compensation.

According to Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that it might be at risk as early as April, but an internal investigation failed to reveal any security issues.

Commenting on this case, Natasha Vernier, Head of Financial Crime at Monzo said:

 “On Friday 6th April, around 50 customers got in touch with us to report fraudulent transactions on their accounts and we immediately replaced their cards.

“After investigating, our Financial Crime and Security team noticed a pattern: 70% of the customers affected had used their cards with the same online merchant between December of last year and April this year. That merchant was Ticketmaster. This seemed unusual, as overall only 0.8% of all our customers had used Ticketmaster.”

As the matter intensified, between 19-20 April, Monzo sent out six thousand replacement cards to customers who had used Ticketmaster. However, on 19 April, Ticketmaster claimed that there was no evidence of a breach. It also said that no other banks were reporting similar security patterns.

IS TICKETMASTER TO BLAME

Now having to defend this behaviour, Ticketmaster is blaming third-party supplier Inbenta for the security breach. And, it has been confirmed that the hack occurred due to a single piece of JavaScript code customised by Inbenta to meet Ticketmaster’s requirements. Identifying a weakness in this code, attackers used this vulnerability to extract customer information as they were paying for tickets.

However, the Inbenta CEO has said that:

 “Ticketmaster directly applied the script to its payments page, without notifying our team. Had we known that the customized script was being used this way, we would have advised against it, as it incurs greater risk for vulnerability.”

Either way, it is likely that Ticketmaster or Inbenta was negligent in safeguarding your data due to insufficient security systems. Just because they were a victim of a crime does not mean they are any less liable.

Worryingly, a senior software developer at a leading UK cybersecurity company has added:

“If the malicious actor had access to this ‘backend’ what else have they done and what dormant malicious code could still be residing ready to activate?”

 With data breaches on the rise, something has to be done to make big companies accountable for data losses, so claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests, it could be the only way to ensure that businesses everywhere implement more secure processes.

 HAVE YOU BEEN AFFECTED?

UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 this year may be at risk, as well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23.

Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those involved. But, while it has offered customers free security software, it has not provided data breach compensation.

If you have been emailed by Ticketmaster and told that your details are at risk, make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data breach compensation claim.

 WHAT SHOULD YOU DO NOW?

With an ICO investigation now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, whoever is to blame for this appalling data protection failure will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. And, while the ICO does not award data breach compensation, our data breach solicitors can help you with that.

We have already been contacted by a high number of Ticketmaster customers who are worried that their personal data was not looked after as carefully as it should have been.

In response, at Hayes Connor, we are preparing to launch compensation claims for everyone who has had their data accessed in the Ticketmaster data breach. Depending on the numbers involved we may even start a group action against Ticketmaster.

To start your compensation claim, you will need you to register with us. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.

REGISTER NOW

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TICKETMASTER WAS WARNED ABOUT DATA HACK​

Earlier this week, Ticketmaster admitted to a huge data protection breach. The hack, which impacts thousands of people in the UK, compromised customer names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details. And, victims should now be looking to secure data breach compensation.

A delay in reporting

While Ticketmaster reported the issue to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) – which it is required to do by law – it seems that the company was alerted to the breach back in early April, but failed to do anything about it. This delay is bound to be taken into consideration in any data breach compensation claim.

Worse, there are now reports that customers have been the victim of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items). And digital bank Monzo believes that Ticketmaster is the link between these fraudulent transactions.

What happened?

According to Monzo, it warned Ticketmaster that something strange was going on two months before the business revealed its payment pages had been hacked. But, in responding to the bank’s concerns, Ticketmaster said that: “an internal investigation had found no evidence of a breach and that no other banks were reporting similar patterns.”

Defending its actions at that time, Ticketmaster is now blaming third-party supplier Inbenta for the security breach. And the failure did happen after Inbenta was infected with malicious software while having access to the Ticketmaster website.

Ticketmaster maintains that: “When a bank or credit card provider alerts us to suspicious activity it is always investigated thoroughly with our acquiring bank, which processes card payments on our behalf. In this case, there was an investigation, but there was no evidence that the issue originated with Ticketmaster.”

However, Inbenta has put the blame back with Ticketmaster. It claims the ticket-giant placed JavaScript on the payment pages it hosts, without Inbenta’sknowledge. It was this script that was abused by hackers. In a statement, Inbenta said: “Had we known that the customized script was being used this way, we would have advised against it, as it incurs greater risk for vulnerability.”

With an ICO investigation now underway into the Ticketmaster data breach, whoever is to blame for this appalling data protection failure will no doubt have to pay a hefty fine. And, while the ICO does not award data breach compensation, our data breach solicitors can help you with that.

In addition to the initial negligence, Ticketmaster will also have to answer questions over why there was a delay in disclosing the breach.

What can you do to claim data breach compensation?

The data breach affects Ticketmaster, TicketWeb andthe resale website Get Me In!

UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 this year may be affected. As well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23.

Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those affected. But, while it has offered customers free security software, it has not provided data breach compensation.

However, it is clear that cybercriminals have access to this data and have already used it to carry our fraud, so more has to be done to hold Ticketmaster and any negligent third-party to account.

If you have been contacted by Ticketmaster and told that your details are at risk, you should make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data breach compensation claim.

As specialist data protection lawyers, we would urge anyone contacted to let us know. If you are a Ticketmaster or Get Me In user and you haven’t received an email make sure that you check your junk mail folder. If you have received an email, get in touch. We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can make a data breach compensation claim.

What’s more, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.

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Ticketmaster admits serious data breach

Ticketmaster has admitted a huge data protection breach and revealed that the personal information of thousands of UK customers is now at risk. The data protection breach happened after a supplier to Ticketmaster was infected with malicious software while having access to the Ticketmaster website. The breach also affects customers of TicketWeb and the resale website Get Me In! Both of which are owned by Ticketmaster.
The company will have to face questions over whether there was a delay in disclosing the breach, as it has been revealed that some UK banks have known about the incident since early April.
The data hack involves both personal and payment information which can be used to carry out data theft and financial fraud. The data stolen includes names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers, payment details and Ticketmaster login details.
According to the Guardian, “a number of Ticketmaster customers have already had fraudulent transactions debited from their accounts, with the fraudsters spending people’s cash on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix, among other items”.
It appears that digital bank Monzo was the first to realise that its customers’ cards were being compromised and even identified Ticketmaster as the shared link in a spike in frauds. However, despite warning Ticketmaster of the issue, Monzo’s head of financial crime said that they “couldn’t get any traction” out of the company.
UK customers who purchased, or attempted to buy, tickets between February and June 23 this year may be affected as well as international customers who purchased, or tried to purchase, tickets between September 2017 and June 23.
Ticketmaster has said that it is working with the relevant authorities, as well as credit card companies and banks.
However, even though Ticketmaster has self-reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), there are no reports of them notifying the police. However, we fully believe that the police should be informed, so it’s important that anyone affected lets them know (as well as letting the ICO know).
Find out more about reporting a cybercrime to the police.

So far, Ticketmaster has offered customers free security software but no monetary compensation. However, you should make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to make a data protection act compensation claim.
In this case, it is likely that Ticketmaster (or its third-party associates) were negligent in safeguarding your data due to insufficient security systems. Just because they were a victim of a crime does not mean they are any less liable. They delay in reporting this issue makes the company’s failure even more severe.
Ticketmaster has said that it has informed those affected.

So, if you have received an email, we would urge anyone contacted to let us know and start a data protection compensation claim.

If you are a Ticketmaster, Get Me In or TicketWeb user and you haven’t received an email make sure that you check your junk mail folder.

If you have received an email, get in touch.

We’ll let you know what is happening in this case and if and when you can claim.

What’s more, it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.
Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected so you could be entitled to around £5,000 in compensation.