social media scam
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Would you fall for this social media scam?

Cybercriminals are targeting people’s social media accounts in a bid to steal money and personal details. In fact, according to reports, a staggering 53% of all logins on social media websites are fraudulent, and 25% of all new accounts are fake[1]. And, while we have all heard about how people are using Facebook and other channels to spread fake news and influence elections, for some people, the consequences are much closer to home. So how can you protect yourself from social media scams?

Facebook PayPal Fraud

In one recent case, a Facebook user received a message from a friend on Facebook claiming he was having trouble with his PayPal account. The friend asked if he would accept some eBay payments on his behalf, and then send the money on to him.

While many of us might be suspicious if we were asked to give money to someone, most people are far less likely to worry about receiving cash. So, being the good friend he was, he accepted two payments and sent them on to the bank details provided.

However, as soon as the money had left his account, he got a message from PayPal saying that the payments he had received were fraudulent, and as such, were being reversed. This left the unwitting victim £300 out-of-pocket. Needless to say, his real friend had never asked for, or received any money.

To make matters worse, PayPal took no responsibility for the stolen cash. And, the young man learned the hard way that you should never take any requests to send money at face value, even if they seem legit.

What can you do to protect yourself from similar social media scams?

When using technology, we must be conscious of the data we are sharing, and how it can be used. Here are some quick tips to keep you safe on social media.

  • Don’t assume a message is authentic. Just because someone knows some personal information about you (i.e. your address, mother’s maiden name etc.), that doesn’t mean they are genuine
  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know
  • Be careful about what you share online (e.g. avoid answering questions like “what was your mother’s maiden name” and “what was the name of your first pet”. Even if they seem to be part of a harmless quiz or post)
  • Remove location data from your posts
  • Use a different password for all your accounts
  • Use two-factor authentication
  • Check the privacy settings of all your accounts
  • Don’t download suspicious apps
  • Think twice before clicking on any links
  • Read the T&Cs of any games or apps you want to use
  • Always check with friends (offline) if they ask you to send money or do anything you are unsure about
  • Keep an eye out for fraudsters looking to gather personal information about you or someone you know
  • Never disclose security details such as your PIN or full banking password to anyone (including anyone claiming to be from your bank)
  • Know that banks or other trusted organisations will never contact you and ask you to transfer money to a secure account
  • If something doesn’t feel right listen to your instincts
  • If you’re worried that you may be at risk, report it to your bank, the Police or Action Fraud straight away.

Today, social media is part of everyday life. So, we would never suggest that you stop using it. But following these simple steps can help you to stay safe.

Get digitally aware

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we want to reduce the number of data violations and successful cyber scams taking place across the UK. To do this, we are raising awareness of this issue and educating people to help stop fraudsters in their tracks.

For more advice on how to keep safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of an online scam, contact us find out how we can help you to recover any losses.


[1] Arkose Labs

ico
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Is the ICO meeting the needs of the individual when it comes to data breaches?

Our managing director Kingsley Hayes has been keeping a close eye on the key data privacy trends that our firm has seen since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force.  And he believes that the Information Commissioner’s Office’s (ICO) approach to data breach enforcement isn’t yet meeting the needs of the individual. But could things be about to change?

What are we seeing?

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we have received thousands of enquiries from customers who have suffered as a direct result of a high-profile data breach. And, every day we are also helping the victims of smaller data breaches. Breaches that are causing misery and upset to people across the UK.

So, as you can imagine, our expert data protection solicitors pay close attention to how the ICO has responded to data breaches of all types and sizes.

In our opinion, the ICO has taken a proactive stance when it comes to commenting on large-scale breaches. This has no doubt been done to secure the attention of the media and politicians. And to make sure that organisations take appropriate action in the aftermath of any breach.

But, while we understand this approach, we also believe that the still ICO requires education on the lasting and full impact of data breaches. Because to date, the experience of the individual is still being downgraded.

Is emotional distress being taken into account by the ICO?

As it stands, the ICO is not coming down hard on organisations that are reporting data breaches and apologising for the violations. This can leave victims of data breaches wondering whether their suffering has even been taken into account.

For example, at Hayes Connor, we have experience of a particular organisation with a track record of committing data breaches that can only be described as atrocious. Over the last four years over 150 reported incidents of the same type have been made. And despite reported changes to process and internal governance, in the months leading up to the implementation of the GDPR another significant and life-affecting breach occurred.

Unfortunately, for those involved in this case, the ICO’s response was less than satisfactory.

Are things about to change?

We hope that, as time progresses, so too will the ICO’s approach. And there are signs that things are changing.

For example, earlier this year the ICO sent a warning shot to all organisations that – while unlikely to make any headlines – has wide-reaching implications.

In this case, the regulator took legal action against a housing developer. The developer had failed to comply with an Enforcement Notice which had been served by the ICO in relation to a failed subject access request. Under data protection laws, such a request allows an individual to request a copy of all the personal information an organisation holds about them.

The ICO won this case, and the developer was ordered to pay a fine and prosecution costs.

Crucially, by supporting the individual and taking robust action in this matter, the ICO demonstrated that it is intent on pursuing any organisation which is not taking its data protection obligations seriously.

However, the role of the ICO is to uphold information rights in the interest of the public and manage the complaints process. To do this effectively it must understand the various psychosocial effects that data breaches can have on individuals.

Thankfully, over the last few years, people are waking up to the reality of mental health. And there is a greater awareness about the lasting effects of physiological suffering and anguish. But more still needs to be done.

Education is vital

According to renowned clinical psychologist and visiting professor in law and psychology at Birmingham City University School of Law, Professor Hugh C. H. Koch education is crucial to ensure the needs of the individual are met. He said:

“Education within the legal media, both written and digital, concerning the psychological effect of data breaches reinforced at legal educational meetings and conferences will raise the bar of how much lawyers know and understand about data breach effects.”

Until then, while much has been achieved since the introduction of the GDPR, there is still a fair way to go before individuals can expect a standard of data protection we should all aspire too.

You can read more about the latest data breach trends here.

Leading by example

At Hayes Connor, we want to reduce the number of data violations taking place across the UK. To do this, we are helping to raise awareness of this issue and educating people and businesses to prevent similar mistakes from happening.

For more advice on how to keep your data safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of a data breach or cyber fraud, find out how we can help you to recover any losses or give us a call to discuss your case in more depth.

student loan scam
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Going to Uni? Don’t fall for this student loan scam!

Many students about to start their university and college courses could fall victim to a cyber scam if they are not vigilant. This follows warnings that fraudsters are aware that students will soon receive their first loan instalment of the year, and are using ‘phishing’ to try and steal this money.

Student Loans Scam

According to the Student Loans Company (SCL), students should be suspicious of any requests for personal or financial information from anyone claiming to be from the SLC or Student Finance England (SFE).

The loan provider claims that, in the last two academic years alone, its counter-fraud teams have stopped more than half-a-million pounds from being phished from student loans.

In most cases, students will receive emails, texts, calls etc. claiming to be from a student loan company. These messages will request personal or financial information that could be used to access their accounts and steal their much-needed money.

Attacks increase just as loan instalments are released. Cybercriminals have also been known to target the parents and partners of students to get access to this data.

What can you do to protect yourself from student loan scams?

Here are some quick tips to keep you safe from this type of scam:

  • Never disclose security details such as passwords
  • Don’t assume an email, text or phone call is authentic. Just because someone knows some personal information about you (i.e. your mother’s maiden name), that doesn’t mean they are genuine
  • Know that legitimate financial organisations would never contact you and ask you to confirm your login information
  • Emails that start ‘Dear Student’ are unlikely to be genuine. But, even if your personal details are included, this doesn’t mean that the communication is real
  • Any warnings such as ‘failure to respond in 24 hours will result in your account being closed’ should start alarm bells ringing
  • Be aware who you’re sharing your personal information with. Only give out details to a service you trust and that you’ve contacted directly or are expecting to be contacted by. Even then, do not hand over sensitive information such as PINs or passwords
  • Don’t be rushed into handing over personal or financial information
  • If something doesn’t feel right listen to your instincts. Leave the conversation if it makes you at all uncomfortable
  • Always question who you’re talking to. If in any doubt call them back using trusted contact details to check the request is genuine
  • Don’t be afraid to say you’ll get back to someone using the phone number or email address as listed on their website. A legitimate organisation would never try to panic you out of taking security checks
  • Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text
  • Make sure you look at the address bar when logging into a website. If there is a padlock icon your connection is secure. If a site doesn’t have this lock icon, do not share any sensitive information
  • If you’re worried that you may be at risk, report it to the Police or Action Fraud straight away.

Get digitally aware

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we want to reduce the number of data violations and successful cyber scams taking place across the UK. To do this, we are raising awareness of this issue and educating people to help stop fraudsters in their tracks.

For more advice on how to keep safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of an online scam, contact us find out how we can help you to recover any losses.

GDPR
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Over a year since GDPR financial organisations still aren’t keeping our data secure

It’s been over a year since GDPR came into effect. But despite this, too many companies still aren’t doing enough to protect our personal and financial information.

In fact, according to RiskIQ, when it comes to financial services organisations, of public PII-capturing websites with a login page, 11.5% of these sites are still capturing this data without adequate security measures.

What is a PII capturing website?

A PII capturing website is one which collects information from its users that can identify them. Examples of PII include names, addresses, dates of birth, email addresses and login credentials.

Is GDPR making an impact?

These findings are very worrying, particularly due to the damage that can be caused if our banking and credit card information falls into the wrong hands. We should be able to have confidence in all organisations that look after our sensitive data, but especially the financial sector.

But the good news is that there are signs that organisations are starting to take their data protection obligations more seriously. And so they should as they risk huge fines and compensation claims should a data breach happen.

It’s just that, so far, most of the data breaches investigated by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) happened before GDPR came into force. And, under the old law the maximum fine for a data protection failure was just £500,000 (and even that wasn’t handed out often).

However, the tide is turning. The ICO has recently announced that it plans to fine the Marriott hotel nearly £100m. And British Airways is being fined £183 million for its high-profile data breach.

At Hayes Connor Solicitors we are paying close attention to how the ICO is responding to new data breaches and are monitoring the impact of the GDPR now it is starting to make a difference.

What should organisations do now?

With most organisations continuing to expand their web presence, it’s essential that more is done. This includes taking steps such as:

  • Maintaining a complete inventory of all PII capturing websites and making improvements to these to make sure they are secure
  • Ensuring that any new sites are built with robust security measure
  • Making sure that companies aren’t collecting personal data they don’t need via their websites.

Making a data breach compensation claims can help

In our experience, the response of organisations following data breaches has been woefully lacking. Too many big companies seem to think they can get away with just saying sorry.

However, such an absence of care over the very real impact of a data breach should not be tolerated or accepted. And, one way that organisations can be forced to put adequate security measure in place is by people taking legal action where they have been let down. Or in other words – hitting them where it hurts. Because unless this happens, the security of the individual won’t be made a priority.


Data protection solicitors

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are committed to upholding the data protection rights of our clients. For more advice on your rights, and how to keep your data safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of a data breach or cyber fraud, contact us to find out how we can help you to recover any losses.

cybercrime help
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How to stay safe from cybercrime

With cybercrime rarely out of the news, it’s only natural that people are worried. Here’s are some top tips to help keep you safe from cybercrime and hackers.

Protect your finances from cybercriminals

  • Contact your bank or credit card provider if you are at all worried that your financial information could be at risk. For example, if you discover that you are the victim of a cybercrime or data breach
  • Keep an eye out for any bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
  • Check your bank statements regularly for any unfamiliar transactions and alert your bank or card provider immediately if there is any suspicious activity
  • Be careful who you trust – criminals may try and trick you by telling you that you’ve been a victim of fraud. Cybercriminals often use this to draw you into the conversation, to scare you into acting and to reveal your security details
  • Don’t be rushed or pressured into making a decision. A trustworthy organisation would never force you to make a financial transaction on the spot
  • Keep an eye on your credit score for any unexpected changes
  • Understand that a genuine bank or other financial organisation will never contact you out of the blue to ask for your PIN or full password
  • Know that a legitimate bank or other business would never ask you to move money to another account for fraud reasons
  • Register with the Cifas protective registration service. This will slow down credit applications made in your name with additional verification checks made to ascertain that the applicant is actually you

Protect your personal data from cybercriminals

  • Do not click on any suspicious links. This could result in you giving a fraudster access to your personal or financial details
  • Beware of any unsolicited communications that refer you to a web page asking for personal data
  • Always question uninvited emails, calls, etc. in case it’s a scam. If you are at all unsure, contact the company directly using a known email or phone number
  • Don’t assume an email, phone call, text or social media message is authentic. Just because someone knows your details (such as your name and address or even your mother’s maiden name), it doesn’t mean they are genuine
  • Don’t accept friend requests from people you don’t know on social media
  • Regularly review your privacy settings on any social media platforms, website and apps you use
  • Change your passwords regularly
  • Use a different password for every account. If you are worried about remembering them all you could sign up to a password manager
  • Make sure your devices are protected by up-to-date internet security software
  • Know that cybercriminals can make any telephone number appear on your phone handset, so even if you recognise a name or number, or if it seems authentic, it might not be genuine
  • Listen to your instincts. If something feels wrong, then it is right to question it and refuse requests for personal or financial information. Stop the discussion if you do not feel in control of it

What if you think you are already the victim of a hacker or fraudster?

  • Report any suspected fraud to Action Fraud
  • If you have had money stolen, contact the police
  • Contact the ICO to let them know about your concerns if you are worried that a data breach has put your data at risk of cybercrime. The ICO might investigate the data breach and, while it does not award data breach compensation, if it believes that the organisation in question broke the law, you can use this information in court to help prove your claim
  • Make sure that if you are offered any form of compensation or free services from the organisation that put your data at risk, you check the small print. Be careful that in accepting an offer you are not giving away your rights to pursue a separate data breach compensation claim at a later date
  • If you want to make a cybercrime compensation claim – for loss of money or emotional distress – you should contact Hayes Connor Solicitors.

Making a cybercrime compensation claim

Our expert, online fraud and data protection solicitors will advise you on whether you have a valid cybercrime compensation claim and will be pleased to answer any questions you might have.

Our initial assessment is always free. We’ll ensure that you are fully informed on this matter and will notify you about your legal rights when making a claim.

For more advice on how to keep your data safe from cybercrime, follow Hayes Connor Solicitors – the data protection experts – on Twitter and Facebook.

cybercrime
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Cybercrime warning to British Gas customers

British Gas is warning customers to look out for scam emails. The cybercrime warning relates to fake emails promising hundreds of pounds in refunds.

A link in the emails takes you to a website that looks exactly like the British Gas site. The site asks people to input their details to have their money “refunded”. However, the website is a clone and any customer who enter their details is giving scammers access to their account. British Gas has warned its customers that falling for the scam could leave them hundreds of pounds out of pocket.

A British Gas spokesperson has said that anyone concerned about a suspicious email can forward it to phishing@centrica.com so that the company can look into it further.

What can you do to protect yourself from cybercrime and scams?

Here are some quick tips to keep you safe from this type of scam:

  • Don’t assume an email, text or phone call is authentic. Just because someone knows some personal information about you (i.e. your mother’s maiden name), that doesn’t mean they are genuine
  • When responding to emails, never give your login or personal details
  • Know that legitimate organisations would never contact you and ask you to confirm your login information
  • Don’t be rushed into handing over personal or financial information. If something doesn’t feel right listen to your instincts
  • Always question who you’re talking to. If in any doubt call them back using trusted contact details to check the request is genuine
  • If you detect a phishing email, mark the message as spam and delete it. This ensures that the message cannot reach your inbox in future
  • Emails that start ‘Dear Customer’ are unlikely to be genuine. But, even if your personal details are included, this doesn’t mean that the communication is real
  • Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text. Even unsubscribe links can be malicious
  • Know that even if an email address appears genuine, this is not a guarantee that it came from the person or organisation that it claims to
  • Any warnings such as ‘failure to respond in 24 hours will result in your account being closed’ should start alarm bells ringing
  • Be aware who you’re sharing your personal information with. Only give out details to a service you trust and that you’ve contacted directly or are expecting to be contacted by. Even then, do not hand over sensitive information such as PINs or passwords
  • Make sure you look at the address bar when logging into a website. If there is a padlock icon your connection is secure. Where a site doesn’t have this lock icon, do not share any sensitive information
  • If you’re worried that you may be at risk, report it to the Police or Action Fraud straight away.

Get digitally aware

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we want to reduce the number of data violations and successful cyber scams taking place across the UK. To do this, we are raising awareness of this issue and educating people to help stop fraudsters in their tracks.

For more advice on how to keep safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of an online scam, contact us find out how we can help you to recover any losses.

 

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Data breach leads to neighbour harassment

The headlines lead us to believe that data breaches occur as a result of cyber-attacks. The reality is that the vast majority of cases take place as a result of human error. In these instances, the breach itself can lead to a damaging chain of events which could have been prevented.

Our solicitors see every day how clients are affected. Financial loss may not be a factor in all cases, but the damage and suffering following a breach can quickly escalate.

What happened in this case?

Our client lives in a privately managed block of flats and she made a complaint about another leaseholder to the management company.

The management company proceeded to forward her detailed email to all residents in the block, including the leaseholder being complained about.

This data breach, which appeared to have taken place due to an error of judgement rather than by mistake, started a frightening chain of events exposing our client to serious harassment and compromised the safety of her family.

Following the breach, our client, who has two young children, was subjected to having the gas pipe to her property deliberately cut with access to the mains deliberately obstructed.

She suspected that the volatile neighbour she had complained about was behind the vandalism, but he denied any wrongdoing.

Having lived at the property for some years, with generally good relations with the other neighbours, the data breach also led to these relationships becoming strained.

Alongside taking legal action against the management company, our client also reported the data breach to the ICO resulting in the business now being monitored to prevent further incidents.

We secured £3,000 compensation from the management company responsible for breaking data protection laws not least, due to the psychological suffering endured by our client and her young children.

The situation has become so intolerable that our client plans to sell her property and move her family in the near future.

Have you been in a similar situation? Contact us today.

Lessons learned

If you are an employee handling a customer complaint of any kind, consider how the complaint should be handled before sharing any information.

Consideration should be given to a possible solution to the complaint and thought put into the appropriate sharing of the complaint with individuals who may be part of the solution.

For more advice on how to keep your data safe, follow Hayes Connor on Twitter or give us a like on Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of a data breach or cyber fraud, find out how we can help you to recover any losses or give us a call on 0151 363 5895 to discuss your case in more depth.

 

thomas cook scam
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Don’t fall for this Thomas Cook scam!

Cybercriminals are getting increasingly clever. And, at Hayes Connor, we regularly hear about the latest dangerous scams. Today we have been alerted to a new scam. One that is targeting people already in distress. So what do you need to know about the Thomas Cook scam?

Thomas Cook refund scam

We found out about this scam when one of our team saw the following post on Facebook:

“Just had a phone call from ‘Thomas Cook refund agent’ going to give me a refund on the holiday I have purchased (no I haven’t) just need my card details and 3-digit number on back to refund me …… this is disgusting…people have lost their jobs and livelihoods and people are already scamming.”

 We couldn’t agree more. This is disgusting. But unfortunately, cybercriminals have no such scruples. In fact, taking advantage of people who are already worried about losing money is a standard trick. That’s because, in a panic to make sure they don’t become a victim, people often give criminals access to the very data they need.

Luckily this person spotted the crime. But not everyone is so aware.

What can you do to protect yourself from online scams?

  • Never disclose security details such as your PIN or passwords to anyone (including your bank)
  • Don’t assume an email, text or phone call is authentic. Just because someone knows some personal information about you (i.e. your address, mother’s maiden name etc.), that doesn’t mean they are genuine. Also, criminals can spoof numbers so that calls and messages look like they are from someone you trust
  • Know that banks or other trusted organisations will never contact you and ask you for your PIN, password or security code. They also won’t ask you to transfer money to a secure account
  • Be aware who you’re sharing your personal information with. Only give out details to a service you trust and that you’ve contacted directly or are expecting to be contacted by. Even then, do not hand over sensitive information
  • Always call an organisation back using trusted contact details to check everything is genuine
  • Don’t be rushed into handing over personal or financial information
  • If something doesn’t feel right listen to your instincts. Leave the conversation if it makes you at all uncomfortable. A legitimate organisation would never try to panic you out of taking security checks
  • Never automatically click on a link in an unexpected email or text
  • If you’re worried that you may be at risk, report it to your bank, the Police or Action Fraud straight away.

 What is the official advice?

When it comes to the Thomas Cook collapse, passengers with ATOL protection who are yet to travel are entitled to a full refund on any future bookings. Customers without ATOL protection should speak to their credit card provider or the company they booked their holiday with. They can also speak to their travel insurance provider to see if they are able to claim back any of their costs.

The government warns that people should be “vigilant and on the lookout for scams, particularly if you receive unsolicited contact from companies suggesting you rebook a Thomas Cook holiday through them.”

According to Gov.UK, it might be a scam if:

  • It seems too good to be true – for example, a holiday that’s significantly cheaper than you’d expect it to be
  • Someone you don’t know contacts you unexpectedly
  • You suspect you’re not dealing with a real company – for example if there’s no postal address
  • You’ve been asked to transfer money quickly
  • You’ve been directed away from trusted sites for payment
  • You’ve been asked to pay in an unusual way – for example, by iTunes vouchers or through a transfer service like MoneyGram or Western Union
  • You’ve been asked to give away personal information like passwords or PINs
  • You haven’t had written confirmation of what’s been agreed.

Get digitally aware

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we want to reduce the number of data violations and successful cyber scams taking place across the UK. To do this, we are raising awareness of this issue and educating people to help stop fraudsters in their tracks.

For more advice on how to keep safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of an online scam, contact us find out how we can help you to recover any losses.

yahoo data breach
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Making a Yahoo data breach claim in the UK

Yahoo suffered a series of hacks by organised crime groups between 2012 and 2016. These attacks were possible due to systemic failures in its cybersecurity systems. One of the worst Yahoo data breaches happened in 2014. In this hack, a Russian state-sponsored cyber-attack saw personal data stolen from over 500 million customers worldwide.

Cybercriminals got access to Yahoo users’:

  • Names
  • Email addresses
  • Telephone numbers
  • Passwords
  • Encrypted security questions and answers.

This information has the potential to cause serious damage to victims of the breach. This includes financial fraud, identity theft and emotional distress.

Has Yahoo paid compensation for these data breaches?

Since 2016, Yahoo has been under intense scrutiny and pressure to do things better.

In June 2018, the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) fined Yahoo £250,000 after investigating failures at the company. This investigation found that Yahoo had not taken appropriate measures to protect customer data. The ICO also discovered that these inadequacies in data security had been in place for a long time.

What’s more, in September 2019, Yahoo confirmed that it was nearing a $117.5 million settlement. Ths payout is designed to end a massive class-action lawsuit for the series of data breaches. However, the money will only be given people who live in the US and Israel.

In the UK, the ICO has fined Yahoo for its data privacy failings. But none of that money will go to victims of the Yahoo data breaches. So, if you are a UK customer of Yahoo, what can you do?

Join our Yahoo data breach group action

Hayes Connor Solicitors is launching a group action to help UK victims of the Yahoo data breach to claim the compensation they deserve.

Find out more about group actions.

If you are concerned that your data was treated negligently by Yahoo, contact Hayes Connor Solicitors immediately. Because of the settlement reached in the US, and the result of the ICO’s investigation in the UK,  you could have a very strong case.

What do you need to know about joining our Yahoo data breach group action?

  • If you had a Yahoo account between January 1, 2012 and December 31, 2016, you could be entitled to data breach compensation
  • You do not need to have suffered any financial loss to claim. If you have experienced damage or emotional upset caused by Yahoo’s breach of the Data Protection Act, you have a right to claim compensation
  • Our Yahoo data breach group action is no win, no fee
  • There are no costs to join our group action and there is no obligation to proceed.

The data breaches at Yahoo happened because of a failure to implement reasonable and robust processes. Yahoo has failed to uphold your privacy rights. Furthermore, claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests. It is often the only way organisations are persuaded to take their responsibilities seriously and make the necessary improvements.

To find out more about joining our group action, and for more information about this case, fill in our quick form. Once done, we will contact you to talk you through the next steps.

REGISTER NOW

 

solicitor data breach
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How Hayes Connor helps our clients after a solicitor data breach

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we help our clients get the compensation they deserve. We do this following data protection breaches, cybercrime, and other online offences. We are also committed to upholding the standards of our industry. That’s why it’s particularly upsetting when we are contacted by someone who has been let down by their solicitor.

Here is just one example of a solicitor data breath case we helped a client with recently.

Solicitor lost sensitive information

In this data breach, a former member of the Armed Forces appointed a solicitor to represent her at a Tribunal she was involved in. However, this solicitor lost her sensitive information, including her medical and service records on a train.

Following this shocking data breach, the woman suffered severe psychological effects including stress, anxiety and trauma. As a result, she has been prescribed medication. And her ongoing conditions have been exacerbated.

Turning to Hayes Connor for help, she revealed that her mental health had deteriorated to such an extent that it affected her ability to leave the house. Furthermore, it led to in her being demoted in work, resulting in a substantial pay cut.

Help is needed after a solicitor data breach

Solicitors must understand the importance of data protection. And make sure that strict policies and procedures are in place to ensure the safe processing of information. Both in and out of the office. However, all too often this isn’t happening. And, as you can see, the result of not looking after personal information properly could put people’s mental health, and potentially even their lives at risk.

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are 100% committed to seeking the compensation necessary to help people get their lives back on track following a data breach. But we don’t believe that our obligation to our clients stops there. We also provide a wide range of information to help our clients protect themselves once a breach has occurred.

Making a solicitor data breach claim

Our professional, friendly team will advise you on whether you have a valid claim against solicitor. If we believe you have a substantial, complex case, we may be able to act for you on a NO WIN, NO FEE basis.

Our process is fully compliant with ICO guidance, and we never put your details at risk. We will NEVER pass your details onto anyone without your permission.

Contact us today for a free initial assessment.


Data protection solicitors

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are committed to upholding the data protection rights of our clients. For more advice on your rights, and how to keep your data safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.