ba data breach
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What evidence do you need to join the BA data breach?

The ICO has announced plans to fine British Airways (BA) a whopping £183.93 million for its 2018 data breach. As a result of the data hack, almost 400,000 British Airways customers had their personal details and bank cards stolen. Enough details were exposed to make the threat of cybercrime a real possibility. Many banks had to cancel and re-issue cards as a result of the breach.

And, while cybercriminals caused the breach, the ICO is coming down strong on BA. This is because the privacy violation was only possible due to inadequate security arrangements at the airline.

However, while the ICO has the power to impose data breach fines, it does not give this money to victims of the data breach. As such, we have launched a group action to help victims of the BA data breach to get the compensation they deserve for their losses. And, we are currently collating valuable information about how this privacy violation has affected people to help us make the strongest claim possible.

What do you need to join our BA data breach?

To join our BA group action, we need evidence that your data was put at risk by the data breach. British Airways claims that it has emailed everyone involved in the violation, so if you still have that email, we can use that to start your claim.

However, in some cases, victims of the British Airways breach may not have received this email. For example, it might have gone into your spam folder. As such, we would advise you to check to make sure you haven’t received an email from the company (but do not click on any suspicious links).

Of course, if the email did go into your spam folder, it may have already been automatically deleted. If this is the case, you will need to provide alternative evidence.

If you haven’t got the email from BA, you can provide:

  • Evidence that you purchased tickets from BA on or between 22.58 on the 21st August 2018 and 21.45 on the 5th September 2018. Only people who bought tickets during this specific timeframe were impacted by the data breach
  • Evidence of any fraudulent transactions/attempts/alerts/cancelled cards that relate specifically to the card you used to purchase tickets from BA
  • Confirmation that, as far as you are aware, your card was not put at risk by another data breach.

What if you haven’t suffered any losses?

If you did use your card to purchase tickets during the above period, but haven’t yet been the victim of any fraudulent activity, this doesn’t mean that you are safe. Often data stolen by cybercriminals is used in batches over time. So, the losses incurred by a data breach are not always immediately apparent.

As such, if you used your card during the affected period, and are worried that you could be at risk, you can still let us know.

What can you do if you were affected by the British Airways data breach?

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, our BA group action allows people affected by this breach to bring a claim on a collective basis. This strengthens their overall position and increases their chances of success.

The BA data breach was able to happen as the airline failed to implement reasonable and robust security processes. So, claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests. The only way organisations will be persuaded to take their responsibilities seriously is by taking strong and decisive action

To join our British Airways data breach action compensation claim, register with us today. We can help you claim compensation for financial losses, as well as for inconvenience and distress.

REGISTER NOW

Equifax agrees to settle data breach for £561 million
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Equifax agrees to settle data breach for £561 million

Equifax has agreed to pay up to £561m ($700m) to settle its data breach case in the US. The 2017 incident resulted in hackers stealing the personal data of millions of people. Up to 143 million US citizens and 15 million Brits were affected by the Equifax data breach.

The Federal Trade Commission believes that the credit reference firm failed to take reasonable steps to secure its network. The huge fine is the FTC’s largest data-breach settlement to date.

Find out more about the Equifax data breach.

What has happened in the US case?

According to FTC spokesperson: “Equifax failed to take basic steps that may have prevented the breach.” For example, while Equifax’s security team ordered that systems be patched within 48 hours after being informed of the discovery, the firm failed to check that this was done. As a result, hackers were able to exploit the flaw and steal consumers’ personal details over many months.

The FTC added: “This settlement requires that the company take steps to improve its data security going forward, and will ensure that consumers harmed by this breach can receive help protecting themselves from identity theft and fraud.”

At least $300m of the fine will go towards paying for identity theft services and other related expenses incurred by victims of the data breach. The rest will be used to cover consumer’ losses, to pay state penalties, and to pay a penalty to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

The deal also requires Equifax to boost its cybersecurity systems. As part of the settlement Equifax had agreed to:

  • Carry out an annual audit of security risks
  • Submit to an external assessment every two years
  • Ensure that third-parties with access to personal data also have adequate data protection measures in place.

What has happened in the UK case?

Following an investigation into the Equifax UK data breach, The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) fined Equifax £500,000.

However, because of when this breach happened, the UK investigation was carried out under old data protection legislation rather than the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). As such, the £500,000 fine was the maximum penalty allowed. So, many believe that Equifax got off lightly.

The ICO investigation also revealed multiple failures at the credit reference agency.

Can you claim compensation for the Equifax data breach in the UK?

Hayes Connor Solicitors has launched an Equifax data breach group action claim as millions of people seek to hold the business to account. This is an essential step in ensuring big companies like Equifax do more to uphold their obligations and keep people safe.

Equifax sent letters to everyone who had their personal details accessed to let them know that they were affected. To join our group action, you will need to provide evidence that you received notification that your details formed part of this breach.

Hayes Connor Solicitors is providing no-win, no-fee funding arrangements in this case, and, if successful won’t charge a “success fee”. This means, if you win £1,500, you get all of the compensation. There are no solicitor’s fees – win or lose.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially as a result of the hack. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Once you register with us, a member of our team will be in touch to explain the next steps.

REGISTER NOW

ticketmaster data breach
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Ticketmaster Data Breach – join our latest group action claim

In 2018, Ticketmaster admitted a huge data protection breach which put the personal and financial information of thousands of UK customers at risk. The data protection breach happened after a supplier to Ticketmaster was infected with malicious software while having access to the Ticketmaster website. The breach also affected customers of TicketWeb, and the resale website Get Me In! Both of which are owned by Ticketmaster. Following the breach, Ticketmaster has closed Get Me In, in a bid to combat touts. However, if you used Get Me In and were affected by the data breach, you can still make a Ticketmaster compensation claim.

What is happening now in the Ticketmaster data breach case?

The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has investigated the Ticketmaster data breach and is now set to fine Ticketmaster for this shocking data privacy failure. As well as the initial breach, the ICO will have looked at whether there was a delay in disclosing the breach, as it was revealed that some UK banks knew about the incident long before the breach was made public. Any delay could mean victims were exposed for longer than necessary.

There are also reports that customers have been the victim of theft, with their cards used on money transfer service Xendpay, Uber gift cards and Netflix (among other items). And digital bank Monzo believes that Ticketmaster is the link between these fraudulent transactions.

Furthermore, nine months after the Ticketmaster data breach, some high street banks sent out replacement credit and debit cards for customers who might have been put at risk.

The impact of the Ticketmaster data breach

A data breach can result in both financial and/or identity theft. And the result of either of these can be devastating. With enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

And it doesn’t matter if there is no evidence that the data has been used to carry out identity theft or financial fraud. If the data breach has caused you stress or anxiety, then the law agrees that you are entitled to compensation.

Nine months after the Ticketmaster data breach, we discovered that:

  • 63% of all our clients have suffered multiple fraudulent transactions on their payment cards
  • 31% of all clients involved in this case suffered from distress and/or psychological trauma.

What’s more, the impact and costs people sustain following a data breach are not always immediately apparent. We are seeing cases where the losses incurred as a direct result of the Ticketmaster data breach are only starting to become clear. This is because data stolen is often used in batches over time.

Is it too late to make a Ticketmaster data breach claim?

No. Over the last year, we’ve talked to hundreds of people who have been affected by this shocking privacy breach. And, at Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are undertaking a group action to claim data breach compensation for customers of Ticketmaster.

Our first group action is ready to be heard in the High Court. But, because of the number of people affected by the Ticketmaster Data Breach, we are now registering people who want to join a second wave of claimants.

What happens if you join our no-win, no-fee group action?

Once you register with us, we will be in touch to find out more about how the breach affected you. We will then progress your claim once our first group action has been decided in court.

Why join a multi-party action?

In many cases, where a data breach occurs, you won’t be the only person making a claim. In such circumstances, it is worth joining a group action data breach claim. Group actions can be a powerful tool and can have a bigger impact than a single claim. In short, it gives us strength in numbers.

Was Ticketmaster responsible for the data breach?

In this case, it is likely that Ticketmaster (or its third-party associates) was negligent in safeguarding your data due to insufficient security systems. Just because they were a victim of a crime does not mean they are any less liable.

Make a Ticketmaster data breach compensation claim

Ticketmaster has informed those affected by the data breach. So, if you have been contacted, we would urge you to let us know and start a data protection compensation claim.

Data breaches often have severe consequences for those affected, so it’s essential to act.

REGISTER NOW

Marriott data breach
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ICO plans to fine Marriott £99 million

The Marriott data breach is one of the most serious data breaches of its kind. The breach put the personal data of 339 million customers at risk. And, today, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) has announced plans to fine the US hotel group £99.2 million.

In a statement, the Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said:

“The GDPR makes it clear that organisations must be accountable for the personal data they hold. This can include carrying out proper due diligence when making a corporate acquisition, and putting in place proper accountability measures to assess not only what personal data has been acquired, but also how it is protected.

“Personal data has a real value so organisations have a legal duty to ensure its security, just like they would do with any other asset. If that doesn’t happen, we will not hesitate to take strong action when necessary to protect the rights of the public.”

This announcement comes a day after the UK’s data privacy regulator said that it planned to fine British Airways £183m over a separate breach. These huge fines reflect changes in data protection law since the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force last year.

However, while the ICO has the power to impose data breach fines, it does not give this money to victims of the data breach. So, if your data was put at risk by Marriott you should now make a data breach compensation claim.

What happened in the Marriott data breach?

On September 8, 2018, Marriott became aware that hackers had managed to access its Starwood guest reservation database. However, when investigating the breach, it was uncovered that cybercriminals had enjoyed access to this database since 2014.

During this time the hackers accessed, copied and removed the private data of millions of customers. The stolen data includes information such as passport numbers, emails, dates of birth, gender and mailing addresses, and in some cases reservation dates. Marriott, also said that it was not able to rule out whether credit card information was exposed.

This theft of personal and financial information could lead to identity and financial fraud. And this has the potential to turn a person’s life upside down.

What did Marriott do wrong?

The ICO’s investigation found that Marriott failed to undertake sufficient due diligence when it bought Starwood. It should also have done more to secure its systems.

What happens now?

Marriott will now have an opportunity to make representations to the ICO as to the proposed findings and sanction. It will appeal the proposed fine.

Marriott International’s president, Arne Sorenson, said: “We are disappointed with this notice of intent from the ICO, which we will contest.”

The ICO will consider carefully the representations made by Marriott, and the other concerned data protection authorities before it makes a final decision.

What can you do if you were affected by the Marriott data breach?

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we have launched a group action against Marriott for this privacy infringement. The action allows people with the same type of claim to bring it together on a collective basis. This strengthens their overall position and increases their chances of success.

Find out more about group actions.

The Marriott data breach was able to happen as the company failed to implement reasonable and robust security processes. So, claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests. The only way organisations will be persuaded to take their responsibilities seriously is by taking strong and decisive action.

To join our Marriott group action data breach action claim, register with us today. We can help you claim compensation for financial losses, as well as for inconvenience and distress.

We can take on your claim on a no-win, no-fee basis.

TAKE ACTION NOW!

british airways breach
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Don’t leave it too late to join the British Airways data breach

This week, the ICO said that it is considering fining British Airways a staggering £183 million for its part in one of the most severe cyber-attacks in UK history. This is because, while cybercriminals hacked the airline, the British Airways data breach was only possible due to inadequate security arrangements.

As a result of the data hack, almost 400,000 British Airways customers had their personal details and bank cards stolen. Enough details were exposed to make the threat of cybercrime a real possibility. Many banks had to cancel and re-issue cards as a result of the breach.

Don’t leave it too late to join our No Win, No Fee, BA data breach compensation case

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are taking a group action against British Airways to help victims of this data breach to claim compensation. We can help you claim compensation for financial losses, as well as for inconvenience and distress.

Make sure you don’t miss out on the compensation you deserve!

Since the data breach, we have been contacted by hundreds of people who were put at risk by BA. And, if you have been in touch about joining this case, it’s vital that you now complete and return the information we have sent to you (links included in our initial documentation).

If you have misplaced this information, or if you require copies, please do not hesitate to email us at enquiries@hayesconnor.co.uk

What if you haven’t previously contacted Hayes Connor Solicitors about the BA data breach?

The action that we are taking against BA is still open to you to join. But, as we have already started our group action case, it is vital that you register with us ASAP.

What is a group action case?

A group action claim is where a group of people – sometimes even thousands of people – have been affected by the same issue. Group action cases are also known as class actions or multi-party actions.

With a group action claim, this group of people (the Claimants) collectively bring their cases to court against a Defendant. In this case, British Airways. These victims then fight together to achieve compensation in the High Court of Justice.

Where cases are very similar, group actions can be a powerful tool and can have a bigger impact than a single claim.

What does the ICO fine mean for this case?

Investigating why the British Airways data breach was able to happen, the ICO found that information was able to be compromised by inadequate security arrangements at BA. This means that BA will be held responsible for its failure to protect customer data. But, while the ICO has the power to impose data breach fines, it does not give this money to victims of the data breach.

However, we can use the evidence uncovered by the ICO to make a very strong case. So, if your data was put at risk by BA, you should now make a data breach compensation claim.

To join our British Airways data breach group action compensation claim, register with us today.

REGISTER NOW

 

British Airways data breach
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British Airways to be fined £183m after customer data breach

Last year, almost 400,000 British Airways customers had their personal details and bank cards stolen in one of the most severe cyber-attacks in UK history. In response, the airline is now facing a staggering £183 million penalty by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

However, while the ICO has the power to impose data breach fines, it does not give this money to victims of the data breach. So, if your data was put at risk by BA, you should now make a data breach compensation claim.

What has the ICO said about the British Airway’s data breach?

Commenting on the proposed fine, Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham said:

“People’s personal data is just that – personal. When an organisation fails to protect it from loss, damage or theft it is more than an inconvenience.

“That’s why the law is clear – when you are entrusted with personal data you must look after it. Those that don’t will face scrutiny from my office to check they have taken appropriate steps to protect fundamental privacy rights.”

British Airways has said that it is surprised and disappointed about the huge penalty.  However, this is still only worth 1.5% of its worldwide turnover. What’s more, under data protection rules, the fine could have been as large as £488 million. So BA could be getting away lightly.

Despite this, BA is hoping to appeal. And, the ICO has said that it will “consider carefully” the representations BA makes as well as other concerned data protection authorities before it takes its final decision.

What did British Airways do wrong?

British Airways customers had their details stolen over 15 days in a massive data breach. The attack put the personal and financial information of customers making bookings at risk. Enough details were exposed to make the threat of cybercrime a real possibility. Also, many banks had to cancel and re-issue cards as a result of the stolen data. In total, about 380,000 transactions were affected.

Investigating why this breach was able to happen, the ICO found that information was able to be compromised by inadequate security arrangements at BA.

Commenting on the proposed penalty, Kingsley Hayes, managing director at Hayes Connor Solicitors said:

“This is the most significant penalty ever handed out by the ICO, and the first to be made public under the new GDPR. With such attacks often having a devastating effect on victims, we are delighted that the ICO is taking the BA data breach so seriously.

“From the start, BA has tried to delay acting on its responsibilities to its customers. For example, when the breach first happened, it said that compensation claims would be discussed on an ‘individual basis’. However, it was never up to the airline to dictate the terms of any compensation payments.

“Following the ICO’s announcement, it looks like the company is still not taking responsibility for its data protection failures in so far as its customers compensation claims are concerned and their lawyers still fail to take a proactive approach to resolving those”.

What can you do if you were affected by the British Airways data breach?

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we are taking action against British Airways. The action allows people with the same type of claim to bring it together on a collective basis. This strengthens their overall position and increases their chances of success.

The BA data breach was able to happen as the airline failed to implement reasonable and robust security processes. So, claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests. The only way organisations will be persuaded to take their responsibilities seriously is by taking strong and decisive action

To join our British Airways data breach action compensation claim, register with us today. We can help you claim compensation for financial losses, as well as for inconvenience and distress.

REGISTER NOW

talk talk breach
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TalkTalk data hack customer details found online

In 2015, a TalkTalk data breach saw the personal information of 157,000 customers stolen. And, in a new twist, BBC Watchdog Live revealed that the company failed to inform 4,545 TalkTalk customers that their data was taken as part of the breach. This includes bank account details.

Making matters worse, BBC researchers found details for many customers online after a simple Google search. This information included full names, addresses, email addresses, dates of birth, TalkTalk customer numbers, mobile numbers and bank details. This information could have been accessible online since the breach.

According to the BBC, viewers contacted Watchdog Live as they were concerned that their details had been breached by TalkTalk. However, the telecom group said that their details were not compromised.

The ICO has already fined TalkTalk

In 2015, TalkTalk spotted issues with its website and immediately launched an investigation before warning customers. However, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) found that that insufficient security at the company permitted customer data to be accessed “with ease”. The ICO also said that TalkTalk could have prevented the data breach if it had taken basic steps to protect its customers’ information.

According to the ICO: “For no good reason, TalkTalk appears to have overlooked the need to ensure it had robust measures in place despite having the financial and staffing resources available”.

In response, the ICO fined TalkTalk £400,000. Two friends from Staffordshire (aged just 21 and 23), breached the TalkTalk website as part of a group of hackers. They have since gone to jail.

Is this a new TalkTalk data breach?

The customer data found by BBC Watchdog Live appears to relate to 2015 data breach. So it is not a new incident.

TalkTalk claims that the historical privacy violation was a genuine error. It also said that it had written to all impacted customers to apologise. And that it wrote to its entire base to inform them about the breach, and advised them about the risk of scam calls. TalkTalk also offered free credit monitoring to protect against fraud.

But, it now looks like 4,545 customers may have received the wrong notification regarding this incident.

Are these customers at risk?

TalkTalk claims that “on their own, none of the details accessed in the 2015 incident could lead to any direct financial loss.”

But our data protection experts would strongly disagree. Savvy cybercriminals can easily piece together a profile by collecting different information from different sources.

Security experts have also confirmed that, with this information, criminals could:

  • Sign up for services
  • Set up direct debits
  • Purchase goods on their victim’s behalf.

Fraudsters could also use this data to carry out a phishing attempt. For example, by pretending to be the victim’s bank to gain more information about them.

The data breached by Talk Talk was extremely sensitive. And the lack of care shown by the company continues to be worrying.

Data breaches can be extremely traumatic

A data breach can cause severe stress and anxiety for victims.

Alan’s TalkTak case

For example, BBC Watchdog Live highlights the case of one man called Alan.* Alan has had his phone, email and bank account bombarded with a series of fraudulent attacks since the Talk Talk hack. Even if these attacks are unsuccessful, this is an extremely distressing situation to be in. So it’s no wonder that Alan feels that TalkTalk has failed its customers “on a gigantic scale”.

According to the BBC, “Whilst Alan will never know if the attacks were a direct result of the TalkTalk data breach, he feels the details leaked are enough to allow fraudsters to impersonate him.”

Maureen’s TalkTalk case

Watchdog also spoke to Maureen.* Maureen was shocked to discover that her details were breached in 2015. Not least because TalkTalk told her that her details had not been stolen. In fact, despite raising concerns with TalkTalk on multiple occasions, she was repeatedly reassured that her information had not been compromised.

Watchdog Live’s investigation found Maureen’s sensitive data through a simple online search.

What happens now?

If the data has come from TalkTalk, then it is vital that the company looks to put right the harm this continued failure has caused its customers. Simply contending that the breach is old news is not good enough.

Watchdog has spoken to many people affected by the TalkTalk data breach. Many of who have been subject to “frequent scam calls”. And in some cases “attempted fraud and identity theft, impacting their credit rating”.

Hayes Connor Solicitors can help

Our expert, online fraud and data protection solicitors will advise you on whether you have a valid data breach compensation claim against TalkTalk. We will also answer any questions you might have.

Our initial assessment is always free. Keeping you fully informed we will also notify you about your legal rights when making a claim.

SIGN UP TO THE TALKTALK DATA BREACH CLAIM


*Not their real names

mermaids data breach
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Have you been affected by the Mermaids data breach?

Mermaids UK, a charity that supports transgender children and young people, has experienced a severe data breach. Mermaids is the UK’s leading charity when it comes to offering support around gender and identity to those under 20. According to an article in the Sunday Times, the Mermaids data breach exposed thousands of private emails between the charity and parents. The emails were made public online.

What happened in the Mermaids data breach?

The privacy violation exposed emails between 2016 and 2017. According to the Times: “More than 1,000 pages of Mermaids’ confidential emails, including anguished messages from parents about their children’s suffering, were uploaded for anyone to view.” It says that the correspondence includes names, addresses and telephone numbers.

However, Mermaids claims that the 1,100 emails were between executives and trustees of the charity. It says that they discussed matters relating to their work. It argues that they were only searchable “if certain precise search-terms were used”.

The charity has said that it is “deeply sorry” for this “historical data breach”. It removed the content from public view after being warned of the leak. It also reported the breach to the Information Commissioner’s Office and the Charity Commission.

Read the Mermaids data breach response in full.

Is the data breach worse than the charity claims?

According to the Sunday Times, the emails contained “intimate details of the vulnerable youngsters it seeks to help”. It reports that these emails could be found by entering the charity’s name and its number into a search engine.

Mermaids denies this and argues that there is “no evidence” that anyone other than the Sunday Times, or those contacted by their journalist had access to the information.

A spokesperson for the charity said: “To be clear this is absolutely not Mermaids service users emailing each other, and their emails and private correspondence being available to an outside audience”.

An independent investigation into the Mermaids data breach will now take place.

How worried should you be?

Commenting on the data breach, a spokesperson from Mermaids said: “At the time of 2016-2017, Mermaids was a smaller but growing organisation.  Mermaids now has the internal processes and access to technical support which should mean such breaches cannot now occur”.

However, regardless of the size of the charity at the time, people using its services had the right to expect that their data was protected. So this doesn’t help those vulnerable individuals whose personal and potentially intimate details were exposed.

Also, it seems like the charity is hoping that it can get away with just apologising and promising that it won’t happen again. But such a noticeable absence of care over the very real impact of a data breach should not be tolerated or accepted.

Every day we see what happens when the personal information of people across the UK falls into the wrong hands. And the consequences can be damaging and long-lasting.

Making a charity data breach claim

Many people are passionate about the charities and causes they care about. But, while you might support their aims, it is vital that they meet their obligations when it comes to protecting your sensitive data.

Where they fail to do this, holding them to account is often the only way to ensure standards are improved. Often charities and organisations are insured against data breaches. So you don’t have to worry about the impact of the good work you support.

Have you been affected by the Mermaids data breach?

Mermaids has contacted those affected by the breach. If your data is at risk, you may be able to make a no-win, no-fee Mermaids data breach compensation claim.

You can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach. Even if you have not experienced any financial loss.

If you are worried that Mermaids UK has put your data at risk, find out how to make a data breach compensation claim. Or contact us today for a free initial assessment.

data breach solicitors
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Worried about the latest Talk Talk data breach revelations? Here’s what you should do

BBC Watchdog Live has revealed that TalkTalk failed to inform 4,545 customers that their personal information was stolen as part of a 2015 data breach. This includes their bank account info. These customers may now have a data breach compensation claim.

To make matters worse, researchers for the programme have discovered the following info online after a simple Google search: full names, addresses, email addresses, dates of birth, TalkTalk customer numbers, mobile numbers, bank details.

It is thought that this information could have been accessible online since the breach.

If you are concerned that your data has been exposed by Talk Talk, we would advise you to:

  • Inform the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) about your concerns
  • Contact your bank and/or credit card providers immediately
  • Beware of fraudsters who attempt to gather personal information (phishing)
  • Report any suspected phasing attempts to the police and relevant authorities
  • Look out for any bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered, or any unfamiliar transactions on your account and alert your bank or card provider immediately if there is any suspicious activity
  • Keep an eye on your credit score for any unexpected dips. Call Credit, Experian and Equifax to ensure credit isn’t taken out in your name
  • Beware of any unsolicited communications that refer you to a web page asking for personal data
  • Register with a suitable fraud prevention service
  • Change your passwords
  • If you are offered any form of compensation or free services from Talk Talk, check the small print. Be careful that in accepting any offer you are not giving away your rights to pursue a data breach compensation claim at a later date.

The ICO has fined TalkTalk but you can still make a data breach compensation claim

The ICO has already fined £400,000 for the 2015 data breach. But it doesn’t look like this matter is over. Especially as 4,545 customers may have received the wrong notification regarding this incident. If you are one of those customers you may be able to make a data breach compensation claim.

Making a data breach compensation claim against Talk Talk

If you want to make a data breach compensation claim, our expert, online fraud and data protection solicitors will advise you on whether you have a valid claim against Talk Talk. We will also be pleased to answer any questions you might have.

Crucially, it doesn’t matter if you haven’t lost out financially because of the data breach. Watchdog says that it has spoken to many people who were affected by the TalkTalk data breach. Many, have been subject to “frequent scam calls, and in some cases attempted fraud and identity theft, impacting their credit rating”. To claim compensation, you must be able to prove that you suffered as a result of the breach. This includes financial harm, as well as anguish and anxiety.

Make a no-win, no-fee data breach compensation claim with Hayes Connor Solicitors

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, our initial assessment is always free. We’ll ensure that you are fully informed on this matter and will notify you about any investigation, and your legal rights when making a claim.

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CYBERCRIME
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Banks try to limit their liability for push payment compensation

Push payment scams happen when cybercriminals trick someone into sending them money by pretending to be someone else. Some victims have been conned into transferring hundreds of thousands of pounds to criminals. In the first half of 2018 alone, such scams saw £145 million stolen by cybercriminals. And, until now, there was little victims could do to secure push payment compensation.

Find out more about push payment fraud.

In response, the industry is looking at a new compensation scheme.

But, responding to a consultation on the introduction of a new code – which could force banks to pay millions of pounds in compensation each year – it seems like the banks are trying to limit their liability for push payment compensation.

  • Santander has proposed that victims whose losses are not considered to be “life-changing” should receive nothing. The bank argues that “smaller” payments of a few hundred pounds should not be eligible for compensation
  • Lloyds has proposed that customers should pay an extra levy every time they make a significant bank transfer to help fund the compensation scheme
  • Barclays has warned that to limit its liabilities for push payment compensation it might need to slow down and block payments for genuine customers
  • Nationwide has suggested that customers it identifies as vulnerable may be barred from some banking services as they present too much of a risk of getting scammed.

What would the new code do?

Under the new scheme, banks would agree to compensate fraud victims for losses if it can be proved that they failed to protect them. Historically, banks have avoided paying push payment scam compensation to victims unless there was a fault in their processes. This is because the customers authorised the fraudulent payments.

However, some banks have already signed up to a new push payment scam compensation fund which has been introduced as an interim measure until a permanent solution can be agreed.

What can you do if you are the victim of push payment fraud?

If you have been the victim of an attempted push payment scam, you should contact Action Fraud. However, if you have lost money as a result of the scam, you must also report it as a crime. You should also notify your bank ASAP.

At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we want to reduce the number of data violations and successful cyber scams taking place across the UK. To do this, we are raising awareness of this issue and educating people to help stop fraudsters in their tracks.

For more advice on how to keep safe, follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Alternatively, if you have been the victim of a push payment scam, find out how we can help you to recover any losses.  Or contact us to discuss your case in more depth. We can help you to claim compensation and steer you through the aftermath of a bank or credit card scam. Ultimately we minimise the impact on you as much as possible.

We can also help you if you became the victim of a bank scam as a direct result of a data breach.