data breach solicitors
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What are your rights if you are ‘named and shamed’?

A restaurant in Cardiff recently hit the news after its owner took to Twitter when a customer missed her reservation. The screenshot of the booking, posted on Twitter, revealed the customer’s name, telephone number and email address. Not only did the post disclose her personal details, but it also triggered a torrent of abuse from other users of the social media site.

When that prospective diner made her reservation, she likely didn’t bank on her personal information being shared all over the Internet. And, while diners who don’t show up are undoubtedly a genuine problem for restaurants, the owner’s decision to ‘name and shame’ the customer wasn’t just poor etiquette, it was a serious violation of her privacy.

We live in a world in which we’ve grown accustomed to sharing our personal information with relative ease – be it on social media sites, through online shopping, or even making a reservation at a restaurant. Unfortunately, this means we are sometimes at risk of that information being shared or used in ways that are inappropriate, or even illegal. So what happens when you become the victim of a data breach?

 The use of personal data is currently governed by the Data Protection Act 1980. This Act is designed to protect storage of personal data, and its rules apply to any organisation, public or private, that has access to third-party data. While data seems like a very technical term, it actually covers all manners of personal information – from things such as name, address, or ethnicity, to more sensitive material such as religious beliefs, expressions of opinion, and sexual orientation.

The Data Protection Bill is currently making its way through Parliament in order to better protect people who share their data. It is intended to update British law, paralleling the EU’s incoming General Data Protection Regulation. This modernisation is a response to the ever-increasing amount of data that is processed, and according to Government, it will strengthen regulations, with tougher sanctions for breaches.

Those sanctions are implemented by The Information Commissioner’s Office (the ICO). The ICO is an independent body that investigates breaches – any individual can report a concern to the ICO, and it will be looked into. The ICO has a range of tools open to it – it can serve enforcement notices, conduct audits, and most notably, it has the power to impose fines of up to £500,000.

Further, when a breach is so serious as to constitute a criminal offence, the ICO can take the matter to court. Recent examples of those prosecuted include a nurse who inappropriately accessed patient files, and a counsellor who sent details of vulnerable clients to his personal email address – data breaches can occur in many different ways, and the consequences can be severe.

However, the ICO does not have the power to award compensation to those who have been directly affected by a data breach. In a case like that of restaurant reservation, where the violation was not only intentional but also arguably malicious, a victim may want to take further action. If the ICO has found an organisation guilty of a data breach, lawyers can work with the evidence that it provides to take private legal action. It isn’t strictly necessary to go to the ICO first, but their findings can strengthen any claim made.

When you supply your information to an organisation, you trust that that information will be used and stored appropriately. This isn’t just a social nicety – it can constitute a legal relationship. The organisation has a duty to you. If that duty is breached, and that breach causes you to suffer a loss, you may be entitled to compensation.

This suffering can be both financial and emotional. In 2015, a group of people brought a successful claim against Google after learning that the company had used their personal information to create targeted advertisements. This was deemed to be misuse of private information. The claimants suffered no financial loss – their claim was based purely on the fact that knowledge of third party access to private information caused them to feel distress and anxiety.

While the customer whose information was shared on Twitter might not necessarily have incurred a financial loss, she was subject to abusive comments from other people online. If this caused her distress, or anxiety, she could be entitled to damages to cover that loss.

In this case, the abuse may well be considered as an aggravating element of the data breach, but online abuse can constitute a separate criminal offence. “Trolling” – the abuse of individuals online – can be prosecuted under the Malicious Communications Act 2003. The threshold for prosecution is high, but with cybercrime on the increase, more measures are being taken to protect victims of online abuse. Another recent cybercrime phenomenon is “doxxing” – the publication of personal information that encourages harassment or criticism of the individual to whom it relates. Perpetrators can be charged under the Serious Crime Act 2007 – naming and shaming can in effect be a criminal offence.

Violations of your right to privacy are extremely serious, and the consequences can be so too. If you think you’ve been the victim of a data breach, you can contact the ICO, or get in touch with a lawyer. It’s easy to become desensitised to the importance of protecting your information, but if something as simple as making a dinner reservation can lead to a stream of online abuse, it shows that when it comes to data protection, it’s important to know your rights.

 

If you’ve been a victim of a data breach you can contact us to find out more about making a claim.

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TSB: What are your rights following the recent data breach?

Following a bungled IT upgrade over the weekend, many TSB mobile and internet banking customers are still unable to access their accounts. And, according to reports, up to 1.9 million could be affected. To make matters worse, some customers have reported that they have been given access to random bank accounts worth thousands of pounds in what could be a terrible breach of personal data.

With many customers now calling for compensation from TSB, it is important that you know your rights.

Getting compensation from the bank

In 2012, The Royal Bank of Scotland was fined £56 million by regulators after a software upgrade left more than 6.5 million customers locked out of their accounts. The bank also paid over £70 million to UK customers. So people who haven’t been able to access their money over the last few days could be in line for compensation.

However, in the TSB case, the breach of personal information could also lead to a raft of data breach compensation claims against the bank.

Currently, both the Financial Conduct Authority and the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) are investigating the IT breakdown. But while they have the power to fine TSB for the failed system upgrade and any data breaches, they do not provide compensation to customers.

So, what can you do if your bank details were put at risk?

If you have suffered damage or distress caused by an organisation breaching any part of the Data Protection Act, you have a right to claim compensation. If you are worried that your banking details have been exposed by TSB, there are a few simple steps you can follow.

  1. Inform the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) about your concerns. While it does not award compensation, if the ICO believes that the organisation in question broke the law, you can use this information in court to help prove your claim
  2. Read our handy step-by-step guide to making a data breach claim
  3. If you are offered any form of compensation or free services for not being able to access your funds it’s important to check the small print. Be careful that in accepting any offer you are not giving away your rights to pursue a separate data breach compensation claim at a later date
  4. Contact Hayes Connor Solicitors ASAP. We’ll ensure that you are fully informed on this matter and will notify you about the investigation and your legal rights when making a claim.

Can you claim compensation if you didn’t lose any money?

In short, yes. In fact, while some people would have us believe that claiming for distress is an overreaction the law doesn’t agree with them.

Many people suffer anguish, anxiety and stress after a data breach and this can have a significant impact on you mentally and physically. Effects can include a lack of sleep, feeling ill, unsettled or confused. Stress can also affect your friends, your family and your job. So being told to just “get over it” isn’t helpful.

Organisations have a duty to protect your sensitive data. And letting other people access our bank accounts is a complete failure of this responsibility. So, why shouldn’t you seek compensation for this inability to look after your information correctly if it has caused you distress?

Start a compensation claim against TSB

If you want to make a compensation claim against TSB, contact Hayes Connor ASAP. Our expert, online fraud and data protection solicitors will advise you on whether you have a valid claim and will be pleased to answer any questions you might have. If you are not sure whether your information has been misused or mishandled, we can find this out for you. Our initial assessment is always free.

If you want to find out more about claiming for a data breach you can contact us here

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TSB data breach. Have your bank details been put at risk?

TSB is the latest company to put its customer’s personal details at risk. The TSB data breach happened after a system upgrade went disastrously wrong over the weekend. According to reports, as well as having problems accessing their money, some TSB customers could see other people’s bank account details.

One customer reported that he had access to more than £20,000 of other people’s accounts, while another said he had access to someone else’s £35,000 savings account, £11,000 Isa, and a business account when he logged onto the bank last night.

The customer said: “I could see their account numbers, sort codes and transaction histories and I had access to transfer money too, if I was that way inclined.

“The thing that was worrying me most was: what if someone can see mine too?”

If found to be true, this is a shocking breach which could result in data breach compensation claims being made against the bank.

TSB has apologised to customers, but on Monday afternoon there were still “intermittent issues” with its services due to “large volumes” of customers trying to access their accounts.

The Financial Conduct Authority is aware of the disruption and will no doubt launch an investigation into this breach.

What can you do?

While angry customers have taken to Twitter over the breach, there is another way to hold TSB to account if you are worried your details are at risk. Something has to be done to make companies accountable for these losses, so claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests, it could be the only way to ensure that businesses everywhere implement more secure processes.

If you want to make a compensation claim against TSB, contact Hayes Connor ASAP. Our expert, online fraud and data protection solicitors will advise you on whether you have a valid claim and will be pleased to answer any questions you might have. If you are not sure whether your information has been misused or mishandled, we can find this out for you. Our initial assessment is always free.

Even if your money hasn’t been stolen, you can still claim compensation. In fact, a recent case has recognised the potential damage that is caused by psychological suffering. So, you can make a compensation claim if you have struggled emotionally following a data breach, even if you have not experienced any financial loss.

If you want to find out more about claiming for a data breach you can contact us here

data breach claims
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Will data breach group action compensation claims be the new PPI?

As data breach experts, here at Hayes Connor, we are preparing to launch group action claims against a number of organisations. But, more people look to hold businesses to account for a breach of trust, comparisons with PPI claims increase.

Are group action data breach claims the new PPI?

When it became clear that people across the UK were mis-sold PPI, often to the tune of thousands of pounds, there was a surge of shiny new claims management companies on the scene. All promising to help consumers get back what they were due.

But, all too often, these companies were more concerned about making fast cash than helping victims. With promises of no up-front fees turning into extortionate commission rates that left people short-changed.

And, it is possible that the same thing could happen here. With high-profile data breaches being seen as a way to make a profit by unscrupulous claims management “factories”. So it’s vital that you are aware of what’s at stake and the options available to you.

Don’t let them get away with it!

Companies must be held to account for their failure to protect our personal data. The sheer scale of the information we share is enough to leave victims open to the threat of fraud. And we should all be very worried about what could happen if this gets into the wrong hands. For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

If a burglar came in and stole all your personal photos, memories etc you would be furious. You would be distressed. This is the 21st-century version of being burgled.

With large-scale, high-profile hacks and breaches happening more and more often, something has to be done to make companies accountable for these losses. So, claiming compensation and joining a group action isn’t just in your best interests. It could be the only way to ensure that they implement more secure processes.

You don’t need to join a group action, you can do it yourself

It is possible to make a claim on your own. And you can even represent yourself in court. In fact, the number of people doing this has increased. The legal term for doing this is called ‘litigating in person’ (LiP). However, there has been a rise in the number of people doing this because they don’t think they have any choice due to a lack of alternative funding options.

The benefits of using an expert data protection lawyer

At Hayes Connor, we believe that the best way to make big companies pay for their failures is to use an expert lawyer. Of course, you would expect us to say that, but let us explain why.

We believe that a group action is the best way forward for large data breach claims. It allows people with the same type of claim to bring it together on a collective basis. This strengthens their overall position and increases their chances of success.

What’s more, with a group action claimants often share the legal fees. Even better, while the cost of pursuing small claims can be a barrier to justice, by grouping cases together, solicitors are often able to run group actions on a no win-no fee basis.

In some group larger actions we expect to be paid by the offending party. So, in such cases, we might even be able to work at no charge to you. This means, when you win, you could receive 100% of the compensation awarded to you.

Strength in our team

Also, we not only have the legal expertise needed to take on big players, but we also appoint an expert barrister to help. This barrister has developed a practice in the field of data breach claims for individuals and companies who have had their personal and sensitive data breached by third parties, and we are confident that our team will get the results you deserve.

When it comes to making a compensation claim, a lack of care can leave data breach victims open to advice and representation below the standard expected by the profession, and this could ultimately see you lose out financially as a result.

But, leading our field when it comes to understanding this often complex area of law, Hayes Connor provides clear and comprehensive advice and legal support to ensure the best possible result for you.

Unlike those unprincipled claims management companies we only ever get in touch with people who have asked us to, which means we NEVER cold call, send spam texts, spam emails, or engage in any other form of nuisance marketing. What’s more, at Hayes Connor we understand that making a compensation claim can be stressful; especially where your sensitive information has already been breached. So, our process is fully compliant with the latest guidance, and we never put your details at risk.

For more advice on how to keep your data safe, follow our #NotJustHackers campaign on Twitter and Facebook.

 

data breach solicitors
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Expedia data breach – have your bank details been exposed?

As news reports everywhere discussed the ins and outs of the Facebook/Cambridge Analytica scandal, another data breach was uncovered last month. But, because the details aren’t as juicy as those in the Facebook case, it didn’t quite get as much coverage. So you might not have heard about it.

But, for victims of the Expedia data hack – which may have revealed the information on thousands of payment cards – the consequences could be even worse. So, what exactly happened, and can you make a data protection act compensation claim if your details are at risk?

Expedia data breach – what happened?

In March, travel fare aggregator Orbitz revealed that between January 2016 and December 2017, hackers gained access to users’ personal information. This included names, phone numbers, emails and billing addresses. Orbitz, which is owned by Expedia, offers booking options and deals on flights, accommodation and holiday activities.

The hack, which is believed to have accessed 80,000 accounts wasn’t discovered until March 2018, which left plenty of time for cybercriminals to put this information to illegal use.

A statement by Orbitz said: “To date, we do not have direct evidence that this personal information was actually taken from the platform and there has been no evidence of access to other types of personal information, including passport and travel itinerary information.”

However, that data that has been accessed is extremely personal and could cause serious damage and distress for victims.

Should you be worried?

The information accessed in the Expedia data hack is enough to leave victims open to fraud. So, if you have been affected, you are right to worry about what could happen if this data gets into the wrong hands. For example, with enough information, cybercriminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts.

Signs that your data has been used by criminals following a data breach include:

  • Bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
  • Unfamiliar transactions from your account
  • An unexpected dip in your credit score
  • Unsolicited communications that ask for your personal data or refer you to a web page asking for personal data.

Don’t be fobbed off!

To help protect users, Orbitz has said those affected can access a year of free credit monitoring and identity protection services. But, given the amount of time that has lapsed between the breach and its discovery, this could be too little too late.

Also, while we do recommend using these types of services – particularly following a data breach – you should make sure that by agreeing to any free offers, you are not inadvertently signing away you rights to make a data protection act compensation claim.

Can you make a data protection act compensation claim?

If you have suffered damage or distress caused by an organisation breaching any part of the Data Protection Act, you have a right to claim compensation. You can claim against a wide range of private organisations and businesses already fined by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO).

As such, if you want to hold Expedia to account we recommend that you inform the ICO about your concerns ASAP.

You can do this here.


However, while the ICO has the power to impose hefty fines on organisations in breach of their duties, it does not award compensation, So, you should also contact us to claim data protection act compensation.

Start your data protection act compensation claim
At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we make sure you receive the maximum compensation possible in the shortest possible time for any financial, medical harm, anguish and anxiety caused by a data breach. We will also let you know when your claim for data protection act compensation can be made and advise you on what to do while waiting for the investigation’s findings.

With large-scale, high-profile hacks and breaches happening more and more often, something has to be done to make companies accountable for these losses. So, claiming compensation isn’t just in your best interests – it could be the only way to ensure that they implement more secure processes.

VISIT OUR SECURE DATA BREACH FORM

facebook data
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Facebook to alert you if your data was shared

From today, Facebook will begin notifying the 87 million people whose personal information may have been improperly shared with Cambridge Analytica.

If your data was leaked, you will receive a message from Facebook at the top of your news feed. This will provide details on how you are affected. You will receive this message if you or your friends used Facebook to log into the This Is Your Digital Life app.

Also, all other Facebook users will receive a notice helping them to turn off specific apps or shut down third-party access to their apps entirely.

While most of those affected are in the US, some people in the UK have also had their details breached. It is understood the messages will be sent out at about 5pm in the UK.

Facebook is now facing investigation both in the UK and the USA. If the social media giant is found to be in breach of the data protection act, you could be entitled to compensation.

 

 

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Facebook Data Scandal

Last week Mark Zuckerberg faced some hard questions about the Facebook data scandal – Here is a round up of what he said:

Hard Questions: Q&A With Mark Zuckerberg on Protecting People’s Information

Mark Zuckerberg

about 2 weeks ago

I want to share an update on the Cambridge Analytica situation — including the steps we’ve already taken and our next steps to address this important issue.

We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can’t then we don’t deserve to serve you. I’ve been working to understand exactly what happened and how to make sure this doesn’t happen again. The good news is that the most important actions to prevent this from happening again today we have already taken years ago. But we also made mistakes, there’s more to do, and we need to step up and do it.

Here’s a timeline of the events:

In 2007, we launched the Facebook Platform with the vision that more apps should be social. Your calendar should be able to show your friends’ birthdays, your maps should show where your friends live, and your address book should show their pictures. To do this, we enabled people to log into apps and share who their friends were and some information about them.

In 2013, a Cambridge University researcher named Aleksandr Kogan created a personality quiz app. It was installed by around 300,000 people who shared their data as well as some of their friends’ data. Given the way our platform worked at the time this meant Kogan was able to access tens of millions of their friends’ data.

In 2014, to prevent abusive apps, we announced that we were changing the entire platform to dramatically limit the data apps could access. Most importantly, apps like Kogan’s could no longer ask for data about a person’s friends unless their friends had also authorized the app. We also required developers to get approval from us before they could request any sensitive data from people. These actions would prevent any app like Kogan’s from being able to access so much data today.

In 2015, we learned from journalists at The Guardian that Kogan had shared data from his app with Cambridge Analytica. It is against our policies for developers to share data without people’s consent, so we immediately banned Kogan’s app from our platform, and demanded that Kogan and Cambridge Analytica formally certify that they had deleted all improperly acquired data. They provided these certifications.

Last week, we learned from The Guardian, The New York Times and Channel 4 that Cambridge Analytica may not have deleted the data as they had certified. We immediately banned them from using any of our services. Cambridge Analytica claims they have already deleted the data and has agreed to a forensic audit by a firm we hired to confirm this. We’re also working with regulators as they investigate what happened.

This was a breach of trust between Kogan, Cambridge Analytica and Facebook. But it was also a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that.

In this case, we already took the most important steps a few years ago in 2014 to prevent bad actors from accessing people’s information in this way. But there’s more we need to do and I’ll outline those steps here:

First, we will investigate all apps that had access to large amounts of information before we changed our platform to dramatically reduce data access in 2014, and we will conduct a full audit of any app with suspicious activity. We will ban any developer from our platform that does not agree to a thorough audit. And if we find developers that misused personally identifiable information, we will ban them and tell everyone affected by those apps. That includes people whose data Kogan misused here as well.

Second, we will restrict developers’ data access even further to prevent other kinds of abuse. For example, we will remove developers’ access to your data if you haven’t used their app in 3 months. We will reduce the data you give an app when you sign in — to only your name, profile photo, and email address. We’ll require developers to not only get approval but also sign a contract in order to ask anyone for access to their posts or other private data. And we’ll have more changes to share in the next few days.

Third, we want to make sure you understand which apps you’ve allowed to access your data. In the next month, we will show everyone a tool at the top of your News Feed with the apps you’ve used and an easy way to revoke those apps’ permissions to your data. We already have a tool to do this in your privacy settings, and now we will put this tool at the top of your News Feed to make sure everyone sees it.

Beyond the steps we had already taken in 2014, I believe these are the next steps we must take to continue to secure our platform.

I started Facebook, and at the end of the day I’m responsible for what happens on our platform. I’m serious about doing what it takes to protect our community. While this specific issue involving Cambridge Analytica should no longer happen with new apps today, that doesn’t change what happened in the past. We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.

I want to thank all of you who continue to believe in our mission and work to build this community together. I know it takes longer to fix all these issues than we’d like, but I promise you we’ll work through this and build a better service over the long term.

[source: Facebook Hard questions]

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MyFitnessPal data breach – know your rights Step-by-step guide to claiming data protection act compensation

Last week it was revealed that MyFitnessPal was breached. Affecting 150 million users, the scale of the breach makes it one of the largest data hacks in history.

What data has been stolen?

The data stolen includes usernames, email addresses and scrambled passwords for both the MyFitnessPal app and the website.

An email from MyFitnessPal to affected users said that on March 25, 2018, Under Armour – the maker of the app – became aware that during February of this year an unauthorised party acquired data associated with MyFitnessPal user accounts. Once informed, Under Armour said that it “quickly took steps to determine the nature and scope of the issue”. It also said that it is working with leading data security firms to assist in its investigation; and that it has notified and is coordinating with law enforcement authorities.

Users have also been given advice on how they can protect their data. However, this could be too little too late.

What can criminals do with this stolen data?

With enough information, cyber criminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts. And, while in this case bank details and home addresses were not put at risk, there is a lot of information that can be collected from an email account.

Signs that your data has been stolen include:

  • Bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
  • Unfamiliar transactions or suspicious activity on your account
  • An unexpected dip in your credit score
  • Unsolicited communications that ask for your personal data or refer you to a web page asking for personal data.

To protect yourself from cyber criminals, make sure you follow the advice provided by MyFitnessPal. In particular, change your password and avoiding clicking on links or downloading attachments from suspicious emails.  

Step-by-step guide to data protection act compensation

If you have had your data stolen, it is also essential that you know your rights.

  1. If you have suffered damage or distress caused by an organisation breaching any part of the Data Protection Act, you have a right to claim compensation
  2. You can make a claim against a wide range of private organisations and businesses already fined by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)
  3. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is an independent authority, set up to uphold information rights in the public interest, and to promote openness by public bodies and data privacy for individuals. While the ICO does not award compensation, it does have the power to impose hefty fines on organisations in breach of their duties
  4. At Hayes Connor Solicitors, we can help you to claim data protection act compensation. We make sure you receive the maximum compensation possible in the shortest possible time
  5. To claim compensation, you must be able to prove that you suffered as a result of the breach. This includes financial and medical harm, as well as anguish and anxiety. In many cases, a violation will not cause damage but will cause distress. This could be especially true in this case should personal fitness and health data be exposed
  6. Until recently, a person who suffered damage might have had their compensation increased to take into account any associated distress, but in most cases compensation would not have been awarded for distress alone. However, a recent ruling has paved the way for those affected by data breaches to claim damages for distress, even if they have not suffered any financial loss.

It is vital to hold large companies to account to ensure better data protection processes are put in place. So, if you have been affected by the MyFitnessPal breach we recommend that you inform the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) about your concerns ASAP.

In addition, if you are a MyFitnessPal user and are worried that your data has been accessed and exploited, you should get in touch with Hayes Connor Solicitors. We will let you know when your claim for data protection act compensation can be made and help you get the redress you deserve. We will also be able to advise you on what to do while waiting for the investigation’s findings.

VISIT OUR SECURE DATA BREACH FORM

equifax
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Have you ever applied for a loan, mortgage, credit card or mobile phone? You could become a victim of identity fraud.

In May 2017, Equifax was the victim of a cyber-attack which put the personal information of over 100,000 UK customers at risk. And, even if you’ve never heard of the company, you could still become a victim of identity fraud. But what do you need to know and how can you secure data protection breach compensation?

What is Equifax?

Equifax is a credit-reference agency. When you apply for a loan, mortgage, credit card or mobile phone, the company you are requesting credit from might use Equifax to check your credit report and decide whether to approve your application. So, even if you are not an Equifax customer, they could hold your data, and this could now be at risk.

What information does Equifax hold?

Because of the nature of what it does, Equifax has a massive amount of information on individuals. This includes personal information, employment records, home addresses and financial details.

Phone numbers, dates of birth, driving licence numbers, email addresses, passwords and partial credit card details were all accessed in the latest breach, which is enough to leave victims open to the threat of fraud. And we should all be very worried about what could happen if this data gets into the wrong hands.

For example, with enough information, cyber criminals can apply for credit in your name, set up fraudulent bank accounts and access your existing accounts. To make matters worse, victims of ID fraud often have no idea that it is even happening until it is too late.

Signs that your identity has been stolen include:

• Bills or emails showing goods or services you haven’t ordered
• Unfamiliar transactions from your account
• An unexpected dip in your credit score.

A breach of trust

It’s clear that your data is a valuable commodity, but all too often companies do not protect this as well as they should do. So, it’s no wonder that data breaches are on the rise. Even worse, in most cases, data losses are entirely preventable; businesses just don’t like investing in cybersecurity, updating their systems, or training their staff.

With large-scale, high-profile hacks and breaches happening more and more often, something has to be done to make companies accountable for these losses. So, claiming data protection breach compensation isn’t just in your best interests – it could be the only way to ensure that they implement more secure processes.

In the Equifax case, the lack of care shown towards those who are affected was made even worse when it was revealed that a former Equifax executive sold his shares in the company before the news of the data breach went public. Earning roughly $1 million in the process, the executive was set to profit at the expense of millions of customers (in the UK and US). Luckily he has since been charged with insider trading, but his actions reflect a disdain for consumer data protection that is all too common.

Don’t be bought off!

As is common in such cases, victims of the Equifax data breach were offered a number of free services to reduce their risk following the hack. These included a credit-report monitoring service, a web monitoring service, the option to get a copy of your credit report by post, and registration to a fraud protection service.

But, if you are offered free services by any organisation following a data breach, it’s vital that you know your rights before you sign up. Make sure you are not inadvertently signing away your rights to pursue a compensation claim at a later date.

So, what can you do to protect yourself and your data?

If you get an Equifax letter telling you that you might be at risk, contact Hayes Connor Solicitors for further advice about what to do. We will keep your details (securely of course!) and ensure you are kept updated about how the investigation into the Equifax hack is progressing.

As no win- no fee data protection solicitors, if Equifax is fined, we will let you know when your claim for compensation can be made and help you get the compensation you deserve.

We will also be able to advise you on what to do while waiting for the investigation’s findings.

VISIT OUR SECURE DATA BREACH FORM